Nuclear Policy

 
 

All

  • Op-Ed
    Lopsided Arms Control
    Rose Gottemoeller December 7, 2000 Carnegie
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    New Carnegie Report on U.S. - Russian Relations Includes Nuclear Policy Recommendations
    December 7, 2000

    In a major new report, An Agenda for Renewal: U.S.-Russian Relations, senior Carnegie Endowment experts call on the new U.S. administration to review its approach to dealing with Russia in several key policy areas.

     
  • Event
    Solving the North Korean Nuclear Puzzle
    Jon Wolfsthal December 7, 2000 Weekly Standard

    Presenters: David Albright, Institute for Science and International Security and Jon Wolfsthal, Associate, Carnegie Non-Proliferation Project

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Flicker of Hope in South Asia
    December 6, 2000

    On December 3, Pakistan announced that its armed forces along Kashmir's Line of Control (LoC) would immediately "observe maximum restraint in order to strengthen and stabilize the cease-fire." This was in response to an unprecedented Indian cease-fire against Kashmiri militants, which took effect on November 27. India says there has been a "recognizable reduction" in firing across the LoC, but by December 6, Indian troops had killed twelve suspected guerillas trying to cross the LoC, arguing that the cease-fire did not extend to infiltrators. Even as each side wondered about the motivations of the other, these developments have engendered cautious optimism about peace prospects in nuclear-armed South Asia, while demonstrating the many hurdles ahead.

     
  • Book
    Politics of National Defense in National Elections
    Joseph Cirincione December 1, 2000 Columbia International Affairs Online

    Unless taken to an extreme, the particulars of a national candidate’s defense policy positions are not likely to swing voters one way or the other.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Naval Missile Defense System Faces Delays
    December 1, 2000

    The schedule for the Navy's Area missile defense program faces significant delays, according to a recent Pentagon comptroller report. The November report damages the case of experts pushing for a rapid deployment of naval-based national missile defenses.

     
  • Event
    205 Days of Putin
    Thomas Graham, Jr., Rose Gottemoeller, Andrew Kuchins November 28, 2000 The Weekly Standard

    Rose Gottemoeller and Thomas Graham, Senior Associates at Carnegie Endowment, and Andrew Kuchins, Director of the Russian and Eurasian Program, discussed Russian geopolitics and nuclear security. The panel was moderated Thomas Carothers, Vice President of Studies. For video clips and transcripts, click here.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    China to Establish Formal Missile Controls, U.S. Waives Sanctions
    November 21, 2000

    The United States today waived sanctions against Chinese entities for missile-related exports to Iran and Pakistan in exchange for a new commitment by China to establish formal and comprehensive missile-related export controls. China announced its intention to publish a formal missile-related export control list, including dual-use items with applications in ballistic missiles, and to require all Chinese entities to obtain an export control license for all controlled items.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Putin Calls For Major Arms Reductions
    November 15, 2000

    Russian President Vladimir Putin stated on November 13 that the U.S. and Russia could slash their arsenals to 1,500 weapons by 2008. He also suggested that there is room for "wide-ranging cooperation in anti-missile defenses for theatres of military operation."

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Nuclear Differences Persist Between Washington and New Delhi
    November 14, 2000

    An effective Indian deterrent against Pakistan and China would require one hundred and fifty nuclear warheads, delivered by missiles or bombers, according to a key advisor to the Indian government on nuclear and strategic issues. Mr. K. Subrahmanyam, a leading member of the National Security Advisory Board, which authored India's Draft Nuclear Doctrine, argues that India should "project a credible deterrence," by working out strategies, policies and a command and control structure. He described India's Draft Nuclear Doctrine as a "most logical, most restrained and most economical" document.

     
  • Testimony
    Non-Proliferation Regime After the Elections
    Joseph Cirincione November 10, 2000 Carnegie
     
  • Event
    Election Matrix
    Joseph Cirincione November 10, 2000 Carnegie

    Presentation at the College of William and Mary by Carnegie Senior Associate Joseph Cirincione

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Russia's Money Crunch Limits Missile Procurement
    November 9, 2000

    As a result of budget constraints, Russia's Strategic Missile Forces are having problems procuring new missiles, Defense News reports.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    North Korean Talks 'Substantive,' But No Deals
    November 6, 2000

    On Friday, November 3, the U.S. and North Korea concluded three days of talks in Kuala Lumpur focused on Pyongyang's missile programs without signing any agreements. U.S. lead negotiator Robert Einhorn characterized the discussions as "detailed, constructive and very substantive," but also emphasized that "significant issues remain to be explored."

     
  • Event
    Mathews on Nuclear Security in South Asia
    Jessica Tuchman Mathews November 2, 2000 Carnegie

    The Diane Rehm Show, National Public Radio

     
  • Event
    Saddam's Bombmaker
    Joseph Cirincione November 2, 2000 Carnegie

    Speaker: Dr. Khidhir Hamza, Former Director of Iraq's Nuclear Weapons Program, and Author of Saddam's Bombmaker: The Terrifying Inside Story of the Iraqi Nuclear and Biological Weapons Agenda with Jeff Stein.
    Chair: Joseph Cirincione, Director, Carnegie Non-Proliferation Project

     
  • Testimony
    Treaties and Unilateral Steps: A Hybrid Approach to Nuclear Reductions and Stability
    Jon Wolfsthal November 1, 2000 Carnegie
     
  • Op-Ed
    Making Sense of Missile Defense
    Joseph Cirincione November 1, 2000 Carnegie

    The next president would do well to conduct a thorough independent reassessment of the threat and various available diplomatic and military options. Such independent assessments could go a long way towards forging not just a domestic but an international consensus on how to most effectively confront global missile proliferation.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Missile Maneuvers with Korea
    October 30, 2000

    After US Secretary of State Albright's historic trip to North Korea the US appears cautiously optimistic that the visit will lead to future progress on a key security issue that has long concerned Washington: North Korea's continued development and export of missiles. The two sides agreed to hold talks on Pyongyang's missile programs this week, reportedly in Kuala Lumpur on Wednesday, November 1. The results of the talks may determine whether President Clinton will visit North Korea later in the year.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Albright Engages North Korea in Substantial Dialogue
    October 23, 2000

    In Pyongyang Tuesday, US Secretary of State Madeline K. Albright concluded the highest level talks between North Korea and the United States since the end of the Korean War. During the three-day visit, Albright addressed a number of US security concerns, including North Korea's missile development programs and missile exports. US officials have stated that further improvement of relations will hinge on North Korea reigning in its missile programs. Negotiations also may lead to an easing of military tensions on the Korean peninsula, and eventual normalization of US relations with the Communist nation.

     
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Carnegie Experts on Nuclear Policy

  • James M. Acton
    Jessica T. Mathews Chair
    Co-director
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Acton holds the Jessica T. Mathews Chair and is co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Fiona Cunningham
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fiona Cunningham is a nonresident scholar in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and was a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow in 2020-21.

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  • Toby Dalton
    Co-director and Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Dalton is the co-director and a senior fellow of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his work addresses regional security challenges and the evolution of the global nuclear order.

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  • Rose Gottemoeller
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Rose Gottemoeller is a nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. She also serves as the Frank E. and Arthur W. Payne Distinguished Lecturer at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

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  • Mark Hibbs
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Hibbs is a Germany-based nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. His areas of expertise are nuclear verification and safeguards, multilateral nuclear trade policy, international nuclear cooperation, and nonproliferation arrangements.

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  • Togzhan Kassenova
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Kassenova is a nonresident fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment.

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  • Ulrich Kühn
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ulrich Kühn is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the head of the arms control and emerging technologies program at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg.

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  • Jamie Kwong
    Stanton Pre-Doctoral Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Jamie Kwong is the Stanton pre-doctoral fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Ariel (Eli) Levite
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Cyber Policy Initiative

    Levite was the principal deputy director general for policy at the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission from 2002 to 2007.

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  • Thomas MacDonald
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Thomas MacDonald is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Ankit Panda
    Stanton Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ankit Panda is the Stanton Senior Fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • George Perkovich
    Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Chair
    Vice President for Studies

    Perkovich works primarily on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation issues; cyberconflict; and new approaches to international public-private management of strategic technologies.

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  • Sinan Ülgen
    Visiting Scholar
    Carnegie Europe

    Ülgen is a visiting scholar at Carnegie Europe in Brussels, where his research focuses on Turkish foreign policy, nuclear policy, cyberpolicy, and transatlantic relations.

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  • Tristan Volpe
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Tristan Volpe is a nonresident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and assistant professor of defense analysis at the Naval Postgraduate School.

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  • Fumihiko Yoshida
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fumihiko Yoshida is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Tong Zhao
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie China

    Tong Zhao is a senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program.

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