Nuclear Policy

 
 

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  • Event
    Dr. Sigfried Hecker on Nuclear Cooperation with Russia
    September 7, 2001

    A Carnegie Proliferation Roundtable

     
  • Op-Ed
    If China Builds More Warheads
    Rose Gottemoeller September 6, 2001 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Op-Ed
    Offense, Defense, and Unilateralism in Strategic Arms Control
    Rose Gottemoeller September 1, 2001 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Reversing Course on Plutonium: An Abdication of Responsibility
    August 21, 2001

    The Bush administration may soon abandon programs to eliminate excess plutonium from nuclear weapons in the United States and Russia. Associate Jon Wolfsthal argues that failure to follow through on efforts to dispose of this material would be an abdication of the national and international responsibility to safeguard future generations from the nuclear legacy of the Cold War.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Getting to No
    August 17, 2001

    Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld returned empty-handed from a truncated set of 'consultations' with Russian President Putin and Defense Minister Ivanov on the issues of missile defenses and nuclear reductions. The failure of the United States to put forward detailed positions regarding reductions in nuclear weapons or missile defense deployments has created the impression in Moscow that these talks are nothing more than a "box checking" exercise designed to provide cover for a future U.S. withdrawal from the ABM Treaty. This failure and impression is bad enough. But remarks by Secretary Rumsfeld on the nature of negotiations and treaties promises to make matters worse and raise serious doubts about the ability of this key official to develop the new strategic framework espoused by President Bush.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Rumsfeld's Rush and Putin's Patience
    August 13, 2001

    Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld completed a shortened series of talks with Russian Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov on August 11 and found himself and the United States no closer to convincing Russia of the need to abandon the ABM Treaty than when he arrived. Why the lack of progress? Associate Jon Wolfsthal provides an analysis.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Dr. Stephen Younger to Head Defense Threat Reduction Agency
    August 10, 2001

    President Bush has named Steve Younger to be the head of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, a Defense Department office responsible for most of the cooperative threat reduction work being carried out with state of the Former Soviet Union. It is unclear how Dr. Younger's selection will affect this work. Dr. Younger gained national notoriety during the government's case against Wen Ho Lee. It was Dr. Younger's testimony, in part, that resulted in Dr. Lee being held in solitary confinement during his year long imprisonment. In 2000, Dr. Younger's authored a paper that lays out the possible role for "mini nukes" as the United States deals with the security challenges of the 21st century.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    You Can't Get There From Here
    August 9, 2001

    Bush administration officials have become fond of describing missile defense opponents as being unable to escape "Cold War thinking." Yet by pursuing missile defenses so aggressively, President George W. Bush may himself prevent the development of the "new strategic framework" with Russia he has tried to champion and reinforce a world where relations are defined by the size and sophistication of nuclear arsenals. Despite Bush's stated intention to reduce U.S. nuclear forces to the lowest levels consistent with national security, the nuclear arsenals in both countries are at Cold War levels and postures.

     
  • Op-Ed
    You Can't Get There From Here
    Jon Wolfsthal August 8, 2001 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    U.S. Won't Go Solo On Arms Control
    August 7, 2001

    Don't believe all the tough talk. The recent opening of simultaneous "consultations" in Moscow between the United States and Russia on nuclear cutbacks and missile defense is the latest sign the Bush administration prefers engaging Russia on nuclear issues rather than going it alone.
    Visiting Scholar Lee Feinstein provides an analysis in the Baltimore Sun.

     
  • Op-Ed
    U.S. Won't Go Solo On Arms Control
    Lee Feinstein August 6, 2001 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Multilateralism A La Carte
    August 6, 2001

    State Department Director for Policy Planning Richard Haass describes the Bush Administration rejection of key international treaties as "a la carte multilateralism." New York Times reporter Thom Shanker says administration officials reject pacts that limit U.S. actions but favor those that restrain others, such as missile technology restraints, the Chemical Weapons Convention and the Non-Proliferation Treaty. But can the whole survive with just some of its parts? Can global security be maintained piece-meal? Project Director Joseph Cirincione warned of the dangers of precisely this approach in Foreign Policy magazine last year.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    U.S.-Russian Strategic Consultations Begin
    July 23, 2001

    The announcement on July 22 by President George Bush and Russian President Vladimir Putin to begin simultaneous "consultations" on nuclear cutbacks and missile defense is the latest sign that the new administration is having to adjust its policies in the face of continuing concern about the go-it-alone approach to strategic issues that has been promoted by many key advisors to the president.

     
  • Event
    Moscow Press Conference
    Rose Gottemoeller, Alexander Pikayev July 19, 2001 Moscow, Russia

    Rose Gottemoeller and Sasha Pikayev address US-Russian relations at the Press Development Institute, in Moscow on July 19, 2001.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Like a Good Neighbor
    July 17, 2001

    The initial western reaction to the new Russian -Chinese "good neighbor" treaty signed in Moscow was to ask if the pact signaled a new anti-U.S. alliance. The question itself shows how far relations between the United States and the two Asian powers have deteriorated and how the missile defense issue may worsen relations and prevent the development of the very type of "new framework" President Bush hopes to form with Moscow.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Test a Little, Deploy a Little: Is That So Wrong?
    July 12, 2001

    Bush administration officials have launched a barrage of view-graphs and talking points against international and domestic opposition to their missile defense plans. It is, in part, a strategy designed to restore an aura of inevitability around plans to deploy missile defenses and abrogate the ABM Treaty. It is part prophylactic, guarding against a possible failure of the July 14 test. Officials released charts depicting multi-billion dollar plans to test and deploy a wide-range of systems. Prototype land, air and sea weapons, they say, could be tested just once and then rushed into "emergency deployment." So, what's wrong with that?

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Senator Richard Lugar on Threat Reduction and Defense
    Joseph Cirincione July 9, 2001 Washington, D.C.

    The Nunn-Lugar program is a tool, a means to an end. Nunn-Lugar has prospered when U.S. policy towards Russia has been guided by a firm hand and a logical policy prescription. Nunn-Lugar cannot take the place of effective and coherent policy; in fact, it cannot operate without effective policy guidance.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    A Tool For the New U.S.-Russian Strategic Relationship
    July 3, 2001

    Senator Richard Lugar (R-Ind) argues that it is vital to maintain and strengthen cooperative threat reductions programs with Russia even as the administration moves away from negotiated nuclear reduction treaties. Missile defense, he says, is important, but it provides what he calls "the fourth line" of defense behind active measures to reduce and prevent threats. We provide below excerpts from his keynote speech at the 2001 Carnegie International Non-Proliferation Conference.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Surveying the Nuclear Cities
    Jon Wolfsthal July 1, 2001 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Testimony
    Europe and Missiles: Changes and Myths
    Joseph Cirincione June 21, 2001

    U.S. officials and scientist have spent over $120 billion over the past 40 years trying to develop an effective counter to ballistic missiles. Despite generous budgets, technology after technology was tried and failed.

     
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Carnegie Experts on Nuclear Policy

  • James M. Acton
    Jessica T. Mathews Chair
    Co-director
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Acton holds the Jessica T. Mathews Chair and is co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Fiona Cunningham
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fiona Cunningham is a nonresident scholar in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and was a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow in 2020-21.

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  • Toby Dalton
    Co-director and Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Dalton is the co-director and a senior fellow of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his work addresses regional security challenges and the evolution of the global nuclear order.

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  • Rose Gottemoeller
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Rose Gottemoeller is a nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. She also serves as the Frank E. and Arthur W. Payne Distinguished Lecturer at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

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  • Mark Hibbs
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Hibbs is a Germany-based nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. His areas of expertise are nuclear verification and safeguards, multilateral nuclear trade policy, international nuclear cooperation, and nonproliferation arrangements.

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  • Togzhan Kassenova
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Kassenova is a nonresident fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment.

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  • Ulrich Kühn
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ulrich Kühn is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the head of the arms control and emerging technologies program at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg.

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  • Jamie Kwong
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Jamie Kwong is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Ariel (Eli) Levite
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Technology and International Affairs Program

    Levite was the principal deputy director general for policy at the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission from 2002 to 2007.

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  • Thomas MacDonald
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Thomas MacDonald is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Ankit Panda
    Stanton Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ankit Panda is the Stanton Senior Fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • George Perkovich
    Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Chair
    Vice President for Studies

    Perkovich works primarily on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation issues; cyberconflict; and new approaches to international public-private management of strategic technologies.

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  • Lindsay Rand
    Stanton Pre-Doctoral Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Lindsay Rand is a Stanton pre-doctoral fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Sinan Ülgen
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie Europe

    Sinan Ülgen is a senior fellow at Carnegie Europe in Brussels, where his research focuses on Turkish foreign policy, nuclear policy, cyberpolicy, and transatlantic relations.

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  • Tristan Volpe
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Tristan Volpe is a nonresident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and assistant professor of defense analysis at the Naval Postgraduate School.

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  • Fumihiko Yoshida
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fumihiko Yoshida is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Tong Zhao
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie China

    Tong Zhao is a senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program.

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