Nuclear Policy

 
 

All

  • Paper
    Enhancing Nuclear Security in the Counter-Terrorism Struggle: India and Pakistan
    Rose Gottemoeller, Rebecca Longsworth July 30, 2002 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Op-Ed
    Pervez, the Friendly Dictator
    George Perkovich July 29, 2002 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    China's Commitment to the Non-Proliferation Regime
    July 22, 2002

    Drawing China into the nuclear and missile non-proliferation regimes has been a long-term process. Since opening a dialogue with China in the early 1970s, the United States has used a range of positive incentives and disincentives to encourage China to sign on to the various unilateral and multi-lateral commitments that make up the international non-proliferation regime. During the 1980s and 1990s, China's nuclear-related exports, particularly to Pakistan, were of major international proliferation concern. China, however, made notable strides in the 1990s by joining formal arms control and non-proliferation regimes.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Russian Assistance to Iran
    July 17, 2002

    The Bush administration had three security priorities with regards to Russia when it assumed office: withdraw from the ABM Treaty, pursue its vision of nuclear arms reduction, and stop Russian assistance to Iran's nuclear and missile programs. Having achieved the first two, the Administration is poised to turn its attention to the issue of Russian assistance to Iran's nuclear weapon and long-range ballistic missile programs. Secretary of State Powell noted as much during his July 9 testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, stating that the issue of Iran would be at the top of the agenda when Powell and Defense Secretary Rumsfeld met with their Russian counterparts in September as part of the newly established four party group.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Treaty Politics
    Jon Wolfsthal July 10, 2002

    President Bush and his administration opposed negotiating a binding arms control agreement to limit nuclear force. President Putin wanted a legally binding document. Each side got what they wanted with the Treaty of Moscow; a legally binding document that fails to control or reduce anything.

     
  • Op-Ed
    The Moscow Treaty Will Not Eliminate Weapons or Reduce Arsenals
    Joseph Cirincione July 1, 2002 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    It Takes More Than Money
    June 28, 2002

    President Bush and the other G-7 countries have agreed to spend up to $20 billion over the next 10 years to fund a new "global partnership for the destruction of weapons of mass destruction." The funds will help Russia better control and eliminate its vast stocks of nuclear materials, as well as chemical weapons and biological weapon agents. The pledge is a major step forward, especially for Europe, Japan and Canada, whose support for threat reduction efforts in Russia have not come any where near to matching the $5 billion contribution made by the U.S. since the collapse of the Soviet Union.

     
  • Op-Ed
    From Summits to Sleepovers
    Rose Gottemoeller June 17, 2002 Washington, D.C.

    If Putin and Bush are able to drive forward on the agenda that they have set for themselves, then we will truly enter a new period of U.S.-Russian partnership. If they do not, then the relationship will drift, and we'll be left with the worst of all worlds -- informality without progress, casual friendship without results.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    No ABM Treaty, No Missile Defense
    June 17, 2002

    Many national security experts, including this one, warned that if the United States withdrew from the Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty there would be an international storm of protest. On June 13, President Bush withdrew from the treaty, and the world went on without a hiccup. There is concern but no outrage. The United States and Russia have just negotiated a new treaty continuing reductions in long-range nuclear weapons but without any limits on future missile defense systems. Relations with Russia have never been better. Is this a complete vindication of the president's policies, as White House officials claim?

     
  • Op-Ed
    Panic Is a Worse Enemy Than 'Dirty' Bombs
    Rose Gottemoeller June 12, 2002 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Exploding Threats - Out of Proportion
    June 12, 2002

    The arrest and detention of alleged dirty bomber Abdullah Al Mujahir sent waves of shock throughout the country. The threat posed by the possible use of a radiological dispersal device remains serious, and a threat for which the United States government and its people are not adequately prepared. In the days since Attorney General Ashcroft's dramatic announcement, however, it is less clear how direct the link is between Al Mujahir and the possible use of a radioactive device. If the Justice Department has exaggerated the nature of the link between the suspect and a dirty bomb, then it needs to re-calibrate its tone and approach.

     
  • Event
    Carnegie Book Release- Deadly Arsenals: Tracking Weapons of Mass Destruction
    Joseph Cirincione, Miriam Rajkumar, Jon Wolfsthal June 12, 2002 Washington, D.C.

    Introduction by Carnegie President Jessica T. Mathews.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    India and Pakistan's Nuclear Capabilities
    June 7, 2002

    There is great uncertainty over the number, location and operational status of the nuclear weapons held by India and Pakistan. The project has prepared a short overview of the two nations' nuclear capabilities drawn from extensive analysis from the latest Carnegie study, Deadly Arsenals: Tracking Weapons of Mass Destruction.

     
  • Event
    Experts Weigh U.S. Role as India-Pakistan Tensions Rise
    Lee Feinstein June 6, 2002 Carnegie

    Listen to audio from this event.

     
  • Paper
    A New Equation: U.S. Policy toward India and Pakistan after September 11
    Lee Feinstein, James Clad, Lewis Dunn, David Albright May 31, 2002 Beirut, Lebanon
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    The Sum of All Nuclear Fears
    Joseph Cirincione, Jon Wolfsthal May 30, 2002 Carnegie

    The two presidents have missed a historic opportunity to set up an international exchange of data on nuclear stockpiles, as well as mutual, verifiable elimination of warheads.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Missile Congeniality
    May 30, 2002

    The following is not our normal project analysis. Rather it is a link to an analysis by Jon Stewart of the Daily Show. This short video clip provides humorous and, some may think, valuable insight into the recent U.S.-Russian nuclear reduction treaty. It features commentary by Project Director Joseph Cirincione. As far as we know, this is the first—and perhaps the last—time that a proliferation expert has appeared on Comedy Central.

     
  • Op-Ed
    India and Pakistan on the Brink
    George Perkovich May 29, 2002 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Op-Ed
    Kashmir Is More Important Than al Qaeda
    George Perkovich May 27, 2002 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    "Limited" War?
    May 22, 2002

    A million Indian and Pakistani troops face-off along the Line of Control. A suicide attack in Kashmir on May 14 leaves thirty-four people, mostly women and children, dead. The Indian army, which has borne the brunt of casualties in Kashmir, is now eager to "teach Pakistan a lesson." Pakistan has reportedly deployed the nuclear-capable, 750 km-range Shaheen missile along the border. This is South Asia heading toward limited war.

     
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Carnegie Experts on Nuclear Policy

  • James M. Acton
    Jessica T. Mathews Chair
    Co-director
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Acton holds the Jessica T. Mathews Chair and is co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Fiona Cunningham
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fiona Cunningham is a nonresident scholar in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and was a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow in 2020-21.

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  • Toby Dalton
    Co-director and Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Dalton is the co-director and a senior fellow of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his work addresses regional security challenges and the evolution of the global nuclear order.

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  • Rose Gottemoeller
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Rose Gottemoeller is a nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. She also serves as the Frank E. and Arthur W. Payne Distinguished Lecturer at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

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  • Mark Hibbs
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Hibbs is a Germany-based nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. His areas of expertise are nuclear verification and safeguards, multilateral nuclear trade policy, international nuclear cooperation, and nonproliferation arrangements.

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  • Togzhan Kassenova
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Kassenova is a nonresident fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment.

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  • Ulrich Kühn
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ulrich Kühn is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the head of the arms control and emerging technologies program at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg.

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  • Jamie Kwong
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Jamie Kwong is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Ariel (Eli) Levite
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Technology and International Affairs Program

    Levite was the principal deputy director general for policy at the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission from 2002 to 2007.

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  • Thomas MacDonald
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Thomas MacDonald is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Ankit Panda
    Stanton Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ankit Panda is the Stanton Senior Fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • George Perkovich
    Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Chair
    Vice President for Studies

    Perkovich works primarily on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation issues; cyberconflict; and new approaches to international public-private management of strategic technologies.

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  • Lindsay Rand
    Stanton Pre-Doctoral Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Lindsay Rand is a Stanton pre-doctoral fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Sinan Ülgen
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie Europe

    Ülgen is a senior fellow at Carnegie Europe in Brussels, where his research focuses on Turkish foreign policy, nuclear policy, cyberpolicy, and transatlantic relations.

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  • Tristan Volpe
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Tristan Volpe is a nonresident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and assistant professor of defense analysis at the Naval Postgraduate School.

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  • Fumihiko Yoshida
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fumihiko Yoshida is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Tong Zhao
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie China

    Tong Zhao is a senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program.

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