Nuclear Policy

 
 

All

  • Proliferation Analysis
    Preventing Nuclear Terrorism
    Jon Wolfsthal April 9, 2002 Washington, D.C.

    Bush administration officials say that because the United States and Russia are no longer enemies, the size of the Russian nuclear arsenal no longer matters. But that sentiment ignores the main risk from Russia: not from a deliberate nuclear attack but the possible leakage of nuclear weapons or material to would-be nuclear states or terrorist groups.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Nuclear Terrorism and Warhead Control in Russia
    Jon Wolfsthal April 5, 2002 Carnegie
     
  • Op-Ed
    On Nukes, We Need to Talk
    Rose Gottemoeller April 2, 2002 Carnegie
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    U.S. Policy on North Korea: The View from Seoul
    Toby March 25, 2002 Washington, D.C.

    A continuation of the current White House policy risks a resumption of hostilities on the Korean Peninsula, but this time with a North Korea that may have the capability to carry war to U.S. territory.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    The Decision Not To Certify
    March 20, 2002

    In a major, potentially disastrous development, the Bush Administration - according to news reports - intends to stop certifying to Congress that North Korea is in compliance with the agreement reached in 1994, known formally as the Agreed Framework. While the administration intends to continue its implementation of the pact, this failure to certify North Korea's compliance will only increase outside criticism of the Agreed Framework and call its successful and full implementation into doubt.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Uncharted Waters: the U.K., Nuclear Weapons and the Scottish Question
    March 14, 2002

    Authors Malcolm Chalmers, Professor of Peace Studies at the University of Bradford and William Walker, Professor of International Relations, University of St. Andrews, explore the consequences of constitutional changes in the United Kingdom for its nuclear weapon policies in their new book.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    A Change in U.S. Nuclear Policy
    March 11, 2002

    New reports show that the still-classified nuclear posture review (NPR) marks a major change in US nuclear policy and an expansion of the role of nuclear weapons. The report calls for new uses and missions for nuclear weapons, the production of new missiles, bombers and submarines, the design of new types of nuclear weapons and major new investments in weapons production facilities.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    The Wrong Target
    Jessica Tuchman Mathews March 11, 2002 Carnegie

    The number one problem in Iraq is not Saddam Hussein but his pursuit of weapons of mass destruction. Without them he is dangerous and despicable but not a threat remotely worthy of American intervention. This truth has a huge bearing on policy that has been largely ignored.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Much Less Explosive Trend
    Joseph Cirincione March 10, 2002 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Russian Debt for Nonproliferation
    March 7, 2002

    On Monday, March 4, Representative Ellen Tauscher (D-Calif.) and Representative John McHugh (R-N.Y.) introduced a bipartisan bill to the House that would allow Russia to reduce its debt in exchange for securing its nuclear materials. This timely bill follows attempts by terrorist groups to obtain nuclear material and a recent intelligence report to Congress stressing the vulnerability of Russian fissile material to theft or diversion.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Inspections in Iraq: A Background Briefing
    March 5, 2002

    What did the UN inspections in Iraq accomplish? For background, the Non-Proliferation Project provides some history and analysis from Tracking Nuclear Proliferation, 1998 with an update from our forthcoming new edition due out in June 2002. Most officials and experts agree that the inspections destroyed far more of Saddam Hussein's weapons of mass destruction capabilities than did the military campaign itself.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Intelligence Failure
    March 4, 2002 Carnegie

    A major reason why the United States was so unprepared for the terrorist attacks of September 11 is that national threat assessments produced over the past few years have consistently pointed policy-makers in the wrong direction. Partisan political agendas distorted these assessments, and fundamentally misled and misdirected national security resources.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Arms Control in a New Era
    Rose Gottemoeller March 4, 2002 Carnegie
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Test-Free, Threat-Free Defense
    February 28, 2002

    If you thought the debate over missile defenses was over, think again. Congressional debate this week shows there is still no consensus in Washington on this troubled program. We provide excerpts from the House Armed Services Committee hearing.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Nuclear Rhetoric and Reality
    February 15, 2002

    The Administrations is using high-flying rhetoric to describe its nuclear posture, but some Senators say the policy is running on empty. Undersecretary of Defense Doug Feith claimed that with the president's announced reductions in the nuclear warheads in the operational strategic force, "we are closing the books on the Cold War balance of terror." Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Carl Levin said it was more like warehousing the terror and compared it to the Enron's Corp.'s efforts to "make its debts disappear by moving them from one set of books to another."

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    New Hope in a Frayed Friendship
    February 15, 2002

    President Bush commended visiting Pakistani President Mussharaf this week, as "a leader with great competence and vision." He assured Pakistan that the U.S. is "committed to the continuance of our friendship. A friendship based on principles, common goals and vision." In a country where people are still bitter about being "abandoned" by the U.S. in the past, Washington's broadly stated commitment to a long-term relationship with Islamabad was the top story in Pakistan.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    The Next Step in Nuclear Non-Proliferation
    February 11, 2002

    On Friday, February 8, 2002, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham spoke to the Los Angeles World Affairs Council regarding the Department of Energy's future policy direction concerning non-proliferation. Secretary Abraham emphasized the importance of securing and eliminating Russian nuclear weapons and materials. The follwoing is an except from Secretary Abraham's speech.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Defending America
    Joseph Cirincione February 8, 2002 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    What Is to Be Done With The Axis of Evil?
    Jon Wolfsthal February 6, 2002 Carnegie

    President George W. Bush's State of the Union remarks labeling Iran, Iraq and North Korea as an axis of evil quickly circled the globe and re-ignited fears of a more aggressive brand of U.S. unilateralism.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    India Anticipates a "Winning Combination"
    February 5, 2002

    The United States and India have revived military-to-military ties for the first time since they were severed in the aftermath of India's nuclear tests in May 1998. For India, these ties reflect the country's growing global status, confirmed by President Bush in his State of the Union address, when he praised relations with India in the same breath as relations with Russia and China.

     
Back to main page

Follow the Nuclear Policy Program

Nuclear Policy Conference 20175

Proliferation News

Enter your email address in the field below to receive the latest Proliferation News in your inbox!

Personal Information
 

Carnegie Experts on Nuclear Policy

  • James M. Acton
    Jessica T. Mathews Chair
    Co-director
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Acton holds the Jessica T. Mathews Chair and is co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • Fiona Cunningham
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fiona Cunningham is a nonresident scholar in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and was a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow in 2020-21.

  •  
  • Toby Dalton
    Co-director and Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Dalton is the co-director and a senior fellow of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his work addresses regional security challenges and the evolution of the global nuclear order.

  •  
  • Rose Gottemoeller
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Rose Gottemoeller is a nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. She also serves as the Frank E. and Arthur W. Payne Distinguished Lecturer at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

  •  
  • Mark Hibbs
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Hibbs is a Germany-based nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. His areas of expertise are nuclear verification and safeguards, multilateral nuclear trade policy, international nuclear cooperation, and nonproliferation arrangements.

  •  
  • Togzhan Kassenova
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Kassenova is a nonresident fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment.

  •  
  • Ulrich Kühn
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ulrich Kühn is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the head of the arms control and emerging technologies program at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg.

  •  
  • Jamie Kwong
    Stanton Pre-Doctoral Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Jamie Kwong is the Stanton pre-doctoral fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • Ariel (Eli) Levite
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Cyber Policy Initiative

    Levite was the principal deputy director general for policy at the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission from 2002 to 2007.

  •  
  • Thomas MacDonald
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Thomas MacDonald is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • Vipin Narang
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Vipin Narang is a nonresident scholar in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • Ankit Panda
    Stanton Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ankit Panda is the Stanton Senior Fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • George Perkovich
    Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Chair
    Vice President for Studies

    Perkovich works primarily on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation issues; cyberconflict; and new approaches to international public-private management of strategic technologies.

  •  
  • Sinan Ülgen
    Visiting Scholar
    Carnegie Europe

    Ülgen is a visiting scholar at Carnegie Europe in Brussels, where his research focuses on Turkish foreign policy, nuclear policy, cyberpolicy, and transatlantic relations.

  •  
  • Tristan Volpe
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Tristan Volpe is a nonresident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and assistant professor of defense analysis at the Naval Postgraduate School.

  •  
  • Fumihiko Yoshida
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fumihiko Yoshida is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • Tong Zhao
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

    Tong Zhao is a senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program.

  •  
 
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
 
1779 Massachusetts Avenue NW Washington, DC 20036-2103 Phone: 202 483 7600 Fax: 202 483 1840
Please note...

You are leaving the website for the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy and entering a website for another of Carnegie's global centers.

请注意...

你将离开清华—卡内基中心网站,进入卡内基其他全球中心的网站。