Nuclear Policy

 
 

All

  • Proliferation Analysis
    The Iraqi National Con
    May 24, 2004

    Richard Perle chauffeured him around Washington, promoting him as the George Washington of Iraq. Vice President Dick Cheney and Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz feted him as the future leader of a free Iraq. Congress funneled tens of millions of dollars into his bank accounts. President George Bush sat him next to First Lady Laura Bush at the State of the Union and led an ovation in his honor. Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich still defended him May 23 on This Week with George Stephanopoulos, but Ahmad Chalabi is now widely discredited, called a thief, a liar, even a spy. Tragically, the harm has been done. Together with his American sponsors he pulled off one of the greatest cons in American foreign policy history: helping to convince the majority of Americans that Saddam Hussein had massive stockpiles of weapons of mass destruction and operational ties to Osama bin Laden. Little of what he said was true. Most of it was believed.

     
  • Event
    Beyond Mutual Assured Destruction: Reducing Russian-American Nuclear Tensions
    Rose Gottemoeller May 20, 2004

    A new study, presented by Dr. Sergey Rogov, Director of the Institute of the USA and Canada.

     
  • Op-Ed
    How to Withdraw from Iraq
    Joseph Cirincione, Anatol Lieven May 18, 2004 Carnegie

    The United States has enough raw military power to flatten Falluja and Najaf, but has recognized that this power cannot be used without dooming not only the U.S. venture in Iraq, but the entire U.S. position in the Middle East.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Rethinking the U.S. Exit Strategy
    Joseph Cirincione, Anatol Lieven May 17, 2004 Carnegie
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Roberts Demands Accountability and An End to Empire
    May 13, 2004

    The issue that troubles most members of Congress is that of accountability," said Senator Pat Roberts (R-KS). "Almost three years after 9/11, no one in the Intelligence Community has been disciplined, let alone fired. Almost two years since the publication of the October 2002 National Intelligence Estimate that declared Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction and was re-constituting his nuclear program, no one has been disciplined or fired. Are we asking too much?" Senator Roberts is the chair of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and a firm supporter of President Bush. His statement is another sign of the sense of crisis growing in Washington.

    Senator Roberts made his remarks on May 3 at Kansas State University. He previewed the report his committee will issue in June on intelligence failures over weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. He said the committee has created an "intelligence matrix" comparing statements from Bush and Clinton administrations and from members of Congress. Many asserted the presence of mass destruction weapons in Iraq, citing intelligence estimates. "The problem is," he said "the information was wrong." He warned that his report "does not paint a flattering picture of the performance of our intelligence community as they developed their pre-war assessments."

     
  • Op-Ed
    The Shape of the Post-War World
    May 7, 2004

    The disaster of Iraq was predictable. Many both inside and outside the administration warned of the consequences of war. They were brushed aside with false claims, comforting promises and utopian visions of a new American Empire. One year ago, this author published his views. The op-ed is reprinted here for your consideration.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    The Utility of Nuclear Weapons
    Rose Gottemoeller May 6, 2004

    The current arguments for and against nuclear weapons revolve around the question of utility: those supporting new weapons, for example, argue that the very utility of such weapons would enhance their effectiveness as a deterrent.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    The North Korean Waiting Game
    May 5, 2004

    On May 12, the United States, North Korea and the other members of the 6-Party talks on North Korea’s nuclear program will hold a first round of working level talks. Don’t expect any progress, however, either at these talks or anytime until after the November U.S. election. Both sides are playing the waiting game and hoping the circumstances will improve their position after the election.

    Each day that passes allows North Korea to advance its nuclear capabilities and further establish itself as the ninth nuclear weapon state. The exact size of North Korea’s nuclear arsenal is a mystery, but press reports suggest that portions of the U.S. intelligence community believe Pyongyang has quadrupled its arsenal to 8-9 weapons in the past year.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Building Trust with Pyongyang May Not Be Enough to End Nuclear Crisis
    Jon Wolfsthal May 4, 2004 Carnegie
     
  • Op-Ed
    Plan B: Using Sanctions to End Iran's Nuclear Program
    George Perkovich, Silvia Manzanero May 1, 2004 Carnegie
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    South Africa's Nuclear Free Decade
    Joseph Cirincione April 27, 2004

    Although South Africa has declared its fissile material inventory to the IAEA, it has not revealed the exact figures to the public. Until complete transparency is achieved, questions will remain about South Africa's nuclear weapon complex, its continued enrichment activities, and the true extent of its non-proliferation commitment.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Remembering Mary McGrory
    April 23, 2004

    I was not a friend of Mary McGrory, but I knew Mary McGrory. I had visited her at her Washington Post office. She called occasionally with questions. I was honored that she quoted me a few times - and I don't mind bragging about it. She wrote beautifully, fearlessly questioning conventions and authorities. Many will miss her carefully constructed columns. It is enlightening to read some of them again; to look back, knowing what we now know, at what she knew then. Here are some excerpts from her articles, with links to many more.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Nuclear Necessity in Putin's Russia
    Rose Gottemoeller April 7, 2004 publisher
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Missile Obsession Distorted Threat Priorities
    Joseph Cirincione April 6, 2004

    In the two months before September 11, five cabinet members, including National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice, traveled to Moscow. They were not there to coordinate counter-terrorism operations or share threat assessments. They were fixated on one mission: convince the Russian leadership to scuttle the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty.

     
  • Op-Ed
    US Elections and Global Security
    Jon Wolfsthal April 1, 2004 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    A Tale of Two Intelligence Estimates
    March 31, 2004

    The failure to find weapons of mass destruction (WMD) in Iraq is frequently portrayed as the result of either intelligence failures or misrepresentation of the intelligence by others. In fact, both were involved. It appears that a third factor was involved as well: misrepresentation of intelligence by the intelligence community itself. One week before lawmakers were to vote on the use of force in Iraq, the CIA released an unclassified version of its just-completed National Intelligence Estimate (NIE). As the intelligence community's definitive judgments on key issues, NIEs are always important documents on which great care is expended. However, this NIE was unusually important because it was the authoritative assessment of the Iraqi threat available to members of Congress on which to base a decision whether to support or oppose a war.

     
  • Testimony
    The Bush Administration and Nonproliferation: A New Strategy Emerges
    Joseph Cirincione March 30, 2004 House International Relations Committee Hearing

    The proliferation of unconventional weapons is the most serious national security threat the United States faces today. While chemical weapons can kill hundreds of people and biological weapons can potentially kill thousands, nuclear weapons are incomparably dangerous in scale of destruction and strategic impact.

     
  • Op-Ed
    The Key Proliferation Questions
    Jon Wolfsthal March 23, 2004 Brussels

    The historic events in Libya, Pakistan, Iraq, Iran and North Korea have raised several key questions that help frame the proliferation debate over the future direction of U.S. non-proliferation policy.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    One Year Later: It Wasn't Us
    March 18, 2004

    The Bush administration, in the face of increasing criticism that it misled the public and Congress about the threat posed by Iraq's weapon programs and the ease of the occupation, last week began a broad defense of the decision to go to war in Iraq. Below we present key excerpts and commentary on the administration's major points. They are: 1) the war was a continuation of Clinton policy; 2) everyone thought Saddam had illicit weapons; 3) officials just repeated what the intelligence agencies told them; 4) they never said the threat was imminent; and 5) they never asserted an operational link between Al Qaeda and Iraq.

     
  • Testimony
    WMD and the United Nations
    Jessica Tuchman Mathews March 10, 2004 بيروت

    This is an extraordinarily important moment for the United Nations. Before attention is lost in the controversies over the war itself and in the challenges of its aftermath, the United Nations must capture, clarify and publicize the record of international inspections in Iraq: for itself, for member governments and for the public.

     
Back to main page

Follow the Nuclear Policy Program

Nuclear Policy Conference 20175

Proliferation News

Enter your email address in the field below to receive the latest Proliferation News in your inbox!

Personal Information
 

Carnegie Experts on Nuclear Policy

  • James M. Acton
    Jessica T. Mathews Chair
    Co-director
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Acton holds the Jessica T. Mathews Chair and is co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • Fiona Cunningham
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fiona Cunningham is a nonresident scholar in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and was a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow in 2020-21.

  •  
  • Toby Dalton
    Co-director and Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Dalton is the co-director and a senior fellow of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his work addresses regional security challenges and the evolution of the global nuclear order.

  •  
  • Rose Gottemoeller
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Rose Gottemoeller is a nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. She also serves as the Frank E. and Arthur W. Payne Distinguished Lecturer at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

  •  
  • Mark Hibbs
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Hibbs is a Germany-based nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. His areas of expertise are nuclear verification and safeguards, multilateral nuclear trade policy, international nuclear cooperation, and nonproliferation arrangements.

  •  
  • Togzhan Kassenova
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Kassenova is a nonresident fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment.

  •  
  • Ulrich Kühn
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ulrich Kühn is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the head of the arms control and emerging technologies program at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg.

  •  
  • Jamie Kwong
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Jamie Kwong is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • Ariel (Eli) Levite
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Technology and International Affairs Program

    Levite was the principal deputy director general for policy at the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission from 2002 to 2007.

  •  
  • Thomas MacDonald
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Thomas MacDonald is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • Ankit Panda
    Stanton Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ankit Panda is the Stanton Senior Fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • George Perkovich
    Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Chair
    Vice President for Studies

    Perkovich works primarily on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation issues; cyberconflict; and new approaches to international public-private management of strategic technologies.

  •  
  • Lindsay Rand
    Stanton Pre-Doctoral Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Lindsay Rand is a Stanton pre-doctoral fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • Sinan Ülgen
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie Europe

    Sinan Ülgen is a senior fellow at Carnegie Europe in Brussels, where his research focuses on Turkish foreign policy, nuclear policy, cyberpolicy, and transatlantic relations.

  •  
  • Tristan Volpe
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Tristan Volpe is a nonresident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and assistant professor of defense analysis at the Naval Postgraduate School.

  •  
  • Fumihiko Yoshida
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fumihiko Yoshida is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • Tong Zhao
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie China

    Tong Zhao is a senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program.

  •  
 
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
 
1779 Massachusetts Avenue NW Washington, DC 20036-2103 Phone: 202 483 7600 Fax: 202 483 1840
Please note...

You are leaving the website for the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy and entering a website for another of Carnegie's global centers.

请注意...

你将离开清华—卡内基中心网站,进入卡内基其他全球中心的网站。