Nuclear Policy

 
 

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  • Op-Ed
    Taming Tehran
    George Perkovich November 24, 2004 Foreign Affairs
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Walking on Eggshells in Tehran
    George Perkovich November 23, 2004 c 2004 Yale Center for the Study of Globalization

    Much of the world breathed a sigh of relief when Iran and three European Union countries recently agreed on a course to resolve the boiling crisis over Iran's nuclear activities. With Iran agreeing to suspend those activities as long as progress is made in structuring a longer-term cooperative relationship with  Europe, the nuclear issue shifted to the backburner. But the relief was cut short by the US claim of new evidence that Iran is violating its commitment not to pursue nuclear weapons.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Walking on Eggshells in Tehran
    George Perkovich November 22, 2004 Yale Center for the Study of Globalization

    Iran's nuclear ambitions have once again returned to the headlines. Just days after the Mideast nation entered an agreement with the European trio – France, Germany, and the UK – US officials made allegations about Iran's continued weapons development. As those accusations remain unsubstantiated, writes nonproliferation expert George Perkovich, the focus of international attention should remain on Iran's deal with Europe. Indeed, facilitating this relationship will be complicated, due to the deep-seated distrust simmering among all involved parties – and the US presence in Iraq further complicates matters. The most effective route to securing a deal, suggests Perkovich, may have to entail UN Security Council involvement: "This would raise the incentives of all parties to fulfill its terms."

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    New Allegations Against Iran
    Revati Prasad, Joseph Cirincione November 17, 2004

    An Iranian opposition group has accused Iran of smuggling in weapons-grade uranium and bomb designs from the A.Q. Khan network and hiding a uranium enrichment facility. On November 17, the National Council of Resistance (NCR) told reporters that in 2001, A.Q. Khan gave Iran a small quantity of highly enriched uranium (HEU), though not enough to make a bomb.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Global Implications of the U.S. Election
    Jon Wolfsthal November 5, 2004 Munhwa Ilbo 中文

    U.S. President George Bush has won reelection. He is the first President to receive more than 50 percent of the votes cast since 1988 and got more votes than anyone President in American history. In addition, his Republican Party has increased its majority in both houses of the US Congress, giving the President an even more comfortable base of support in Washington. Overall, President Bush can claim a mandate from the American people, and it is reasonable for him and his advisors to view the vote as an endorsement on their policies and priorities. This will have serious and possibly profound implications for US policy and for many other countries, particularly key US allies in East Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. The end result may be to project the split nature of American politics onto the rest of the world, forcing countries to choose between the United States or alternative approaches to their security.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Global Implications of the U.S. Election
    Jon Wolfsthal November 4, 2004 Munhwa Ilbo
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Dealing With Iran

    Iran has been caught breaking its obligations under the NPT, and is now being investigated by the IAEA and the Security Council. France, Germany, and the United Kingdom, on behalf of the EU, have taken the lead in trying to reverse Iran’s threatening course. If Iran gets away with acquiring nuclear weapons in these circumstances, it would make a mockery of the nonproliferation regime. The Middle East would become even more dangerous. In short, Iran may be the proliferation tipping point.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Framing the Issues
    Ingrid Bruns October 27, 2004

    In presenting its case for war in Iraq, Bush administration officials carefully framed the issues in ways compatible with its larger goals and forced opponents to debate on its terms. By controlling the questions, the administration could control the answers. Instead of addressing the risks of invading Iraq, officials emphasized the risks of not invading Iraq. Instead of a careful assessment of costs and benefits, they cast the decision to go to war as a test of strength and resolve. This tactic is best illustrated in the way the administration presented its three main points: Iraq was a gathering threat, Saddam Hussein was a madman who could not be deterred, and Iraq was tied to September 11 and the war on terror.

     
  • Event
    Book Launch of "Common Sense on Weapons of Mass Destruction"
    Rose Gottemoeller, Thomas Graham October 21, 2004 Washington, D.C.

    On October 21, 2004, The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace hosted a launch of a new book Common Sense on Weapons of Mass Destruction by Ambassador Thomas Graham, Jr.. Rose Gottemoeller, Senior Associate at the Carnegie Endowment, moderated the session.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Brazil Tests Bush Policies on Proliferation
    Jon Wolfsthal, Joshua Williams October 12, 2004

    President Bush and Senator Kerry both stated that stopping the spread of nuclear weapons would be the top priority for their respective administrations. Yet, for the current President there is a clear disconnect between US goals and current policy. Nowhere is this as striking as in the case of Brazil, where the President is not implementing the very policies he announced in a major speech on February 11, 2004.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Producing Plutonium at Rokkasho-mura

    In 2006, Japanese power utilities hope to open the nation’s first commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in the remote village of Rokkasho. The facility will combine the plutonium with recovered uranium, a product known as mixed-oxide or MOX. Although there is currently no commercial demand for this product, Japan’s Atomic Energy Commission is fully in favor finishing the plant.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    We Are Losing the War in Afghanistan
    Joseph Cirincione, Joshua Williams September 23, 2004


    It has been called the forgotten war. What seemed two years ago to be a shining example of American military power and international leadership is now a growing morass. The Taliban is back, Al Qaeda roams the countryside and Osama bin Ladin mocks America from his mountain redoubt. Assassins in the last week barely missed killing both the president and the vice-president in separate attacks on this fledgling democracy’s government.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    We Are Losing the War In Iraq
    September 21, 2004

    Every major military indicator shows the war in Iraq is going badly. The United States is losing ground, losing hearts and minds, and losing the war. Every day this month, on average, three U.S. soldiers have been killed in Iraq. This is up from the death rate in August, which was up from July's toll. Major cities are now considered too unsafe for U.S. forces to enter. Washington officials insist Iraqi elections will take place as planned in January 2005, but officials in Baghdad are more pessimistic. "We are in deep trouble in Iraq," warned Republican Senator Chuck Hagel last Sunday. And this, according to a new intelligence assessment, is the best case.

     
  • Event
    The Problems and Prospects of the New Alaska Missile Interceptor Site
    Phil Coyle, Gen. Eugene Habiger, Joseph Cirincione September 20, 2004 Washington, D.C.

    For the first time in American history, a president will deploy a major weapon system without knowing whether it works. Top experts discuss the deployment of five missile interceptors at Fort Greely, Alaska.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Two Terrifying Reports: The US Senate and the 9/11 Commission on Intelligence Failures Before September 11 and the Iraq War
    September 15, 2004 Disarmament Diplomacy
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Looking for Threats in All the Wrong Places
    Joseph Cirincione September 15, 2004

    When Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld was told on the morning of Sept. 11 that a second plane had hit the World Trade Center, he paused, then continued his morning intelligence briefing, according to the 9/11 Commission.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Detecting Nuclear Tests
    September 13, 2004

    If last week’s startling explosion in North Korea were really a nuclear test, it is certain that the world would know it by now. Thanks to a combination of technological advancements and international cooperation, there are both national and international monitoring systems in place that can detect nuclear tests worldwide. These systems are able to tell us, with scientific precision, whether or not an atmospheric, space-based, underground, or underwater explosion was nuclear in nature.

     
  • Book
    The Russian Military: Power and Policy
    Dmitri Trenin, Steven E. Miller September 9, 2004 American Academy Studies in Global Security

    This book assesses today's Russian military and analyzes its possible future direction.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Does Moscow Know Something That Washington Doesn't?
    Jon Wolfsthal September 2, 2004

    The Russian Atomic Energy Agency announced on September 1 that additional troops had been dispatched to guard nuclear facilities throughout Russia.The troop move is a sign that Russia recognizes that the threat to its nuclear facilities. US programs to assist Russian nuclear security also need to recognize that the threat has changed and move to accelerate and expand ongoing efforts.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    The IAEA’s Report on Iran: No Slam Dunk
    September 2, 2004

    Last year, after European Union ministers won a freeze in Iran’s nuclear uranium enrichment activities, U.S. officials had an opportunity to exploit this breakthrough and negotiate an end to a potentially hostile program. The right combination of force and diplomacy might have worked to allow Tehran to build nuclear reactors, but not the nuclear fuel-fabrication processes that keep Iran’s nuclear bomb-making capabilities alive. Administration hardliners prevailed, however, and the United States pursued a more confrontational approach. They apparently believed that they had solid evidence of Iranian violations of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty that would allow them to bring Iran before the UN Security Council, or provide justification for military strikes against the regime. But, it was no slam dunk.

     
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Carnegie Experts on Nuclear Policy

  • James M. Acton
    Jessica T. Mathews Chair
    Co-director
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Acton holds the Jessica T. Mathews Chair and is co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Fiona Cunningham
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fiona Cunningham is a nonresident scholar in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and was a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow in 2020-21.

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  • Toby Dalton
    Co-director and Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Dalton is the co-director and a senior fellow of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his work addresses regional security challenges and the evolution of the global nuclear order.

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  • Rose Gottemoeller
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Rose Gottemoeller is a nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. She also serves as the Frank E. and Arthur W. Payne Distinguished Lecturer at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

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  • Mark Hibbs
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Hibbs is a Germany-based nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. His areas of expertise are nuclear verification and safeguards, multilateral nuclear trade policy, international nuclear cooperation, and nonproliferation arrangements.

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  • Togzhan Kassenova
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Kassenova is a nonresident fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment.

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  • Ulrich Kühn
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ulrich Kühn is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the head of the arms control and emerging technologies program at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg.

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  • Jamie Kwong
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Jamie Kwong is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Ariel (Eli) Levite
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Technology and International Affairs Program

    Levite was the principal deputy director general for policy at the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission from 2002 to 2007.

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  • Thomas MacDonald
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Thomas MacDonald is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Ankit Panda
    Stanton Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ankit Panda is the Stanton Senior Fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • George Perkovich
    Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Chair
    Vice President for Studies

    Perkovich works primarily on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation issues; cyberconflict; and new approaches to international public-private management of strategic technologies.

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  • Lindsay Rand
    Stanton Pre-Doctoral Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Lindsay Rand is a Stanton pre-doctoral fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Sinan Ülgen
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie Europe

    Sinan Ülgen is a senior fellow at Carnegie Europe in Brussels, where his research focuses on Turkish foreign policy, nuclear policy, cyberpolicy, and transatlantic relations.

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  • Tristan Volpe
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Tristan Volpe is a nonresident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and assistant professor of defense analysis at the Naval Postgraduate School.

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  • Fumihiko Yoshida
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fumihiko Yoshida is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Tong Zhao
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie China

    Tong Zhao is a senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program.

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