Nuclear Policy

 
 

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  • Testimony
    No Good Choices--The Implications of a Nuclear North Korea
    Jon Wolfsthal February 25, 2005 中文

    The North Korean Nuclear Challenge: Is There a Way Forward?

     
  • Op-Ed
    Verhandeln, Drohen, Belohnen
    Joseph Cirincione February 23, 2005
     
  • Op-Ed
    The Unexpected Nonproliferation Partner
    Rose Gottemoeller February 16, 2005 The Moscow Times

    Amidst bold declarations among the regimes in North Korea and Iran, last week was a bad one for nuclear nonproliferation.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Not So Fast
    Jon Wolfsthal February 10, 2005

    US officials recently briefed Chinese and South Korean officials on information they maintain proves North Korea shipped uranium hexafluoride to Libya.

     
  • Policy Outlook
    Iran Is Not an Island: A Strategy to Mobilize the Neighbors
    George Perkovich February 1, 2005 中文

    To mobilize all of the international actors opposing Iranian nuclear development, the U.S. must recognize that Iranian proliferation, Persian Gulf security, the U.S. role in the Middle East, Israel’s nuclear status, and Palestinian-Israeli relations are all linked and cannot be resolved without a more balanced U.S. stance.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Senator Levin Critiques Secretary Rice's Iraq Claims
    January 27, 2005

    We reproduced below an extended excerpt from Senator Carl Levin's speech to the Senate, January 25, 2005. Senator Levin provides a compelling analysis of Secretary Rice's statements on Iraq's weapons capabilities before the Iraq war began.

    "Dr. Rice’s record on Iraq gives me great concern. In her public statements she clearly overstated and exaggerated the intelligence concerning Iraq before the war in order to support the President’s decision to initiate military action against Iraq. Since the Iraq effort has run into great difficulty, she has also attempted to revise history as to why we went into Iraq.

    …Dr. Rice is not directly responsible for the intelligence failures prior to the Iraq war. The Intelligence Community’s many failures are catalogued in the 500 page report of the Senate Intelligence Committee. But she is responsible for her own distortions and exaggerations of the intelligence which was provided to her.

    Here are a few of those exaggerations and distortions.

    (Read More)

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Rice Pledges Strong Support to Nunn-Lugar Efforts
    Joseph Cirincione January 19, 2005

    The very first question Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Richard Lugar asked Secretary of State-nominee Condoleezza Rice was on his efforts to streamline and improve the Nunn-Lugar nonproliferation and disarmament programs: "Does the administration support this legislation?" Rice responded enthusiastically, "I really can think of nothing more important than being able to proceed with the safe dismantlement of the Soviet arsenal, with nuclear safeguards to make certain that nuclear weapons facilities and the like are well secured."

    Rice also agreed to put accelerating the program on the agenda of the next Bush-Putin meeting, and endorsed the early passage of the Law of the Sea Treaty. We provide, below, a full excerpt of the Lugar-Rice exchange at this hearing, held January 18, 2005, and links to the full hearing transcript.

    (Continue)

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    An Unnecessary War
    Joseph Cirincione January 13, 2005

    The official end to the U.S. search for weapons in Iraq confirms what most observers had known for over a year and what UN inspections indicated before the war: Iraq did not have any significant amount of chemical, biological or nuclear weapons or long-range missiles. Some old weapons produced before the 1991 war may still be found, but it is clear that the main justification for launching the 2003 invasion of Iraq was not true. As a Carnegie study concluded one year ago, administration officials systematically misled the American people as to the nature of the threat and the need for military action.

    Saddam Hussein, who had ruled the nation in a brutal dictatorship since 1979, had actively pursued such programs and had produced thousands of tons of chemical and biological weapon agents during the 1980s. The programs were ended and the stockpiles destroyed by the 1991 Gulf War and United Nations disarmament activities that followed.

    (Continue)

     
  • Op-Ed
    Not One Claim Was True
    Joseph Cirincione January 10, 2005 中文

    Hoodwinked: The Documents That Reveal How Bush Sold Us a War
    By John Prados

    Reviewed by Joseph Cirincione

    As George W. Bush and Dick Cheney lower their hands after being sworn in for their second terms, they will be smiling. And with good reason. They will have gotten away with the greatest con in the history of the American presidency. They willfully and systematically misled the American people and our closest allies on the most crucial question any government faces: Must we go to war?

     
  • Event
    Satellite Views of the Hermit Kingdom: New Perspectives on North Korea
    January 6, 2005 Washington, D.C.

    A special multimedia presentation and discussion presented by the Non-Proliferation Project.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    2004 was a difficult year. Will 2005 be any better?
    Jon Wolfsthal December 29, 2004

    It is now two years since North Korea withdrew from the Nonproliferation Treaty and since Pyongyang restarted its plutonium production program. The results of efforts by South Korea, China, Japan and particularly the United States have failed to convince North Korea to abandon its nuclear program and are now little but an empty shell of a policy. 2005 will be a difficult year.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Annus Horribilis in Iraq
    Joseph Cirincione December 27, 2004

    Former National Security Adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski has been making a lot of sense all year. A man known for his hard-line views and no nonsense style, he told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer Christmas weekend that prospects for success in Iraq were dim.

    "We have paid a high price in blood, and it's increasing, " he said.  "You cannot underestimate the suffering that this has already produced to tens of thousands of American families. We have killed tens of thousands of Iraqis; no one knows precisely how many. We're spending billions of dollars. And we have isolated ourselves internationally. Now, that is simply not worth the price of removing Saddam, because we were containing him."

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    UN High-Level Panel Report: Reducing Demand for Nuclear Weapons
    Caterina Dutto December 23, 2004

    The new UN report, "A More Secure World: Our Shared Responsibility," addresses emerging threats of the 21st century. It identifies erosion of the Non-Proliferation Treaty, the stagnation of disarmament efforts, illicit nuclear trafficking, and the potential threat of nuclear terrorism major crises of the nonproliferation regime as. The report proposes a multi-layered response to these threats.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Iran’s Nuclear Program May Trigger the Young Turks to Think Nuclear
    Mustafa Kibaroglu, Ph.D December 20, 2004

    Iran's nuclear program is becoming an increasingly large issue in Turkey. Despite abundant publications worldwide about Iran’s alleged efforts to develop nuclear weapons for more than two decades, Turkish security elite have only recently started to express concerns about the subject. To date, their stance vis-à-vis Iran’s nuclear program would be categorized as one of negligence.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Phil Coyle Explains Why the Alaska Site Doesn't Work
    Phil Coyle December 16, 2004

    It's time for some straight talk about missile defense, including the scientific and technical challenges which it faces and which, if not solved, will prevent the system from being effective, no matter how much money is spent on heavy construction, re-bar and concrete.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    One Year Later in Libya
    Joseph Cirincione, Revati Prasad December 16, 2004

    One year ago this December 19, Libya announced it was abandoning its nuclear weapon and missile programs after over two decades of trying to build a bomb. Since then, Libya has permitted international officials to inspect 10 previously undisclosed nuclear sites and to remove and destroy all key components of its programs. Libya is a model for how to end a nation’s nuclear weapon program by changing regime behavior rather than by changing the regime.

     
  • Event
    The Future of the Nonproliferation Regime
    Alexei Arbatov December 13, 2004 Moscow

    Discussion on Russian perspective on the relationship between nuclear deterrence and nuclear proliferation.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Strengthening non-proliferation rules and norms- the three state problem
    George Perkovich December 2, 2004 United Nations Institue for Disarmament Research
     
  • Op-Ed
    Persian Dilemmas: The discouraging lessons of U.S.-Iranian relations
    Michael McFaul December 2, 2004 Slate

    Carnegie senior associate Michael McFaul reviews Kenneth Pollack's new book, The Persian Puzzle: The Conflict Between Iran and Ameri

     
  • Op-Ed
    How the U.S. Should Take on Iran
    Michael McFaul, Abbas Milani November 28, 2004 San Jose Mercury News

    Senior associate Michael McFaul and Hoover fellow Abbas Milani on the Iran nuclear crisis.

     
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Carnegie Experts on Nuclear Policy

  • James M. Acton
    Jessica T. Mathews Chair
    Co-director
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Acton holds the Jessica T. Mathews Chair and is co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Fiona Cunningham
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fiona Cunningham is a nonresident scholar in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and was a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow in 2020-21.

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  • Toby Dalton
    Co-director and Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Dalton is the co-director and a senior fellow of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his work addresses regional security challenges and the evolution of the global nuclear order.

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  • Rose Gottemoeller
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Rose Gottemoeller is a nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. She also serves as the Frank E. and Arthur W. Payne Distinguished Lecturer at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

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  • Mark Hibbs
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Hibbs is a Germany-based nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. His areas of expertise are nuclear verification and safeguards, multilateral nuclear trade policy, international nuclear cooperation, and nonproliferation arrangements.

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  • Togzhan Kassenova
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Kassenova is a nonresident fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment.

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  • Ulrich Kühn
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ulrich Kühn is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the head of the arms control and emerging technologies program at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg.

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  • Jamie Kwong
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Jamie Kwong is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Ariel (Eli) Levite
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Technology and International Affairs Program

    Levite was the principal deputy director general for policy at the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission from 2002 to 2007.

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  • Thomas MacDonald
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Thomas MacDonald is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Ankit Panda
    Stanton Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ankit Panda is the Stanton Senior Fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • George Perkovich
    Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Chair
    Vice President for Studies

    Perkovich works primarily on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation issues; cyberconflict; and new approaches to international public-private management of strategic technologies.

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  • Lindsay Rand
    Stanton Pre-Doctoral Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Lindsay Rand is a Stanton pre-doctoral fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Sinan Ülgen
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie Europe

    Sinan Ülgen is a senior fellow at Carnegie Europe in Brussels, where his research focuses on Turkish foreign policy, nuclear policy, cyberpolicy, and transatlantic relations.

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  • Tristan Volpe
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Tristan Volpe is a nonresident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and assistant professor of defense analysis at the Naval Postgraduate School.

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  • Fumihiko Yoshida
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fumihiko Yoshida is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Tong Zhao
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie China

    Tong Zhao is a senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program.

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