Nuclear Policy

 
 

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  • Proliferation Analysis
    An American Patriot
    Joseph Cirincione November 6, 2003

    Charles E. Bennett was a war hero, a man of deep religious belief, a southern conservative Democrat, and a member of the House of Representatives for 44 years. He believed in a strong military, large defense budgets, a powerful Navy and integrity in government.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Brzezinski on the Paradox of America's Global Isolation
    November 4, 2003

    The following is an extended excerpt of a speech by former national security advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski from the October 28-29 Conference, "New American Strategies for Security and Peace." Dr. Brzezinski concludes, "American power worldwide is at its historic zenith. American global political standing is at its nadir." He warns, "Since the tragedy of 9-11 which understandably shook and outraged everyone in this country, we have increasingly embraced at the highest official level what I think fairly can be called a paranoiac view of the world...The state of isolation in which the United States finds itself today is due in part because that skewed view of the world is intensified by a fear that periodically verges on panic that is in itself blind. By this I mean the absence of a clearly, sharply defined perception of what is transpiring abroad regarding particularly such critically important security issues as the existence or the spread or the availability...of weapons of mass destruction."

     
  • Op-Ed
    Now is Time for U.S., Iran to Have Their Overdue Talk:
    George Perkovich November 2, 2003 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Brief Reflections on the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Regime
    October 30, 2003 Brussels

    The NPT has been a huge success story for 35 years in stemming nuclear proliferation. In the 1990s, however, cracks began to emerge in that regime and they have grown and become serious enough to threaten the stability of the entire regime.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    The European Union's Non-Proliferation Strategy
    October 30, 2003

    The Political and Security Committee of the Council of the European Union outlined its Basic Principles for an EU Strategy against Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction. Later that week, the EU issued an Action Plan to implement the strategy.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    The Success of Europe’s ‘Soft Power’?
    October 28, 2003

    Europe is celebrating the British, French and German foreign ministers' diplomatic coup in Tehran last week. The three foreign ministers succeeded in convincing Iran to agree to suspend uranium enrichment activities and to sign the Additional Protocol to its IAEA safeguards agreement, authorizing more intrusive inspections. Most European commentators are hailing this breakthrough as an important achievement for Europe. The Austrian Der Standard called it "the greatest success for European diplomacy in ten years of political union, since the Maastricht Treaty."

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Iran Agrees to Nuclear Demands
    October 21, 2003

    On October 21, Iran announced that it would temporarily suspend its uranium enrichment program and sign the Additional Protocol, requiring more robust inspections. Iranian officials declined to specify the duration or form of this suspension. The tougher inspection system would authorize International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors to perform spot checks of any suspicious sites, without prior notice. Dr. Rowhani, head of Iran's Supreme National Security Council, stated that Iran would probably sign the protocol before the November 20th IAEA board meeting.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Assessing DOD Control of Surplus Chemical and Biological Equipment and Material
    Samia Amin October 15, 2003

    A General Accounting Office investigation into the Defense Department's disposition of excess lab supplies revealed that the Pentagon is selling equipment usable for bio-terrorism, over the Internet at discount prices.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Iran's Nuclear Challenge
    October 10, 2003

    On October 8, Iran's President Mohammed Khatami said Tehran will cooperate "to assure the world that we are not pursuing nuclear weapons, which truly we are not.'' He also, however, reaffirmed Iran's determination to continue enriching uranium as its "obvious legal right." This is the core dilemma. The October 31 IAEA-imposed deadline for Iran is fast approaching. Will Iran, as required, resolve all outstanding questions on its nuclear program, and suspend all its uranium-enrichment activity?

     
  • Op-Ed
    Breaking the Stalemate in Iran
    Rose Gottemoeller October 7, 2003 Carnegie
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    The Kay Contradiction
    October 3, 2003

    Buried in the October 2 congressional testimony of David Kay were two bombshells: all the Iraq Survey Group evidence collected to date indicates that there were not any active programs to develop or produce chemical or nuclear weapons. In the middle of a paragraph halfway through his testimony, Kay presents what should have been his lead finding: "Information found to date suggests that Iraq's large-scale capability to develop, produce, and fill new CW munitions was reduced - if not entirely destroyed - during Operations Desert Storm and Desert Fox, 13 years of UN sanctions and UN inspections." Similarly, three paragraphs into Kay's description of Saddam's intention to develop nuclear weapons, he says: "to date we have not uncovered evidence that Iraq undertook significant post-1998 steps to actually build nuclear weapons or produce fissile material."

     
  • Op-Ed
    Asia's Nuclear Arc
    Joseph Cirincione, Husain Haqqani October 2, 2003 Washington, D.C.

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has demanded that Iran give a full and final accounting of its nuclear activities by Oct. 31, or risk action by the U.N. Security Council. Iran's eastern neighbor, Pakistan, and Pakistan's traditional rival, India, have already tested nuclear weapons. India's neighbor and rival, China, has been a nuclear power for many years.

     
  • Event
    Iraq Briefing with Jessica Mathews
    Marina Ottaway, Joseph Cirincione September 30, 2003 The Washington Post

    Jessica Mathews, president of the Carnegie Endowment, has returned from a Department of Defense-sponsored trip to Iraq. She joined Carnegie colleagues for a briefing. Read transcript.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Nukes Endanger Asia's Future
    Joseph Cirincione, Husain Haqqani September 29, 2003 Washington, D.C.
     
  • Event
    Second Moscow International Nonproliferation Conference
    September 19, 2003 Carnegie

    Held at the Metropol Hotel, Moscow, Russia.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    The Air Force Dissents
    September 11, 2003

    The Wall Street Journal reported September 10 that when President George Bush and Secretary of State Colin Powell were warning that Iraq could strike the U.S. with biological and chemical weapons carried by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), these "top policymakers would have known that the Air Force disagreed with this assessment." Original claims of Iraq's UAV capability, particularly in Secretary Powell's statement to the United Nations February 5, 2003, impressed many observers including this author. The Washington Post quoted Joseph Cirincione on the Iraqi UAV capabilities outlined by Powell, "This is the kind of thing that Iraq could use to attack Israel. It is a very effective example of the persistence of Iraq's efforts."

     
  • Op-Ed
    New U.S. - Russian Approach Needed on Iran
    Jon Wolfsthal September 8, 2003 Washington, D.C.

    Even during the depths of the Cold War, the United States and the Soviet Union often worked together to halt the spread of nuclear weapons to new countries. Unfortunately, the approaches being pursued by both countries will do nothing to slow Iran's ability to produce nuclear weapons, and a new approach and better coordination is desperately needed before it is too late.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Flawed Approaches on Iran
    Jon Wolfsthal September 2, 2003 Paris
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    The Kay Report Comedown
    September 2, 2003

    The Boston Globe discloses that later this month David Kay, head of the 1200-person Iraq Survey Team, will report that although US troops and experts have been unable to find any hard evidence of chemical, biological or nuclear weapons or long-range missiles, they have uncovered a vast conspiracy to deceive United Nations inspectors. According to Globe reporter Bryan Bender, Kay "will build a strong, but largely circumstantial case that Hussein dispersed his weapons programs." Kay will say that he has found evidence of intentions to possibly build such weapons after inspectors left the country.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Inflated Trailer Threat
    August 13, 2003

    The revelation that engineers from the Defense Intelligence Agency do not believe that two trailers found in Iraq are mobile bioweapons laboratories comes as a three-part blow to the administration. First, it is another sign of the deep divisions the prewar claims have generated within the intelligence community, a divide unprecedented in recent memory. Second, it raises serious questions about the truthfulness of earlier defense department statements that all the experts agreed the trailers could only be used to make biological weapons. Finally, by deflating the only significant piece of evidence uncovered in five months of searches by US troops, it undermines the credibility of claims that Iraq poised such a dangerous and imminent threat that UN inspections could not be allowed to proceed.

     
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Carnegie Experts on Nuclear Policy

  • James M. Acton
    Jessica T. Mathews Chair
    Co-director
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Acton holds the Jessica T. Mathews Chair and is co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • Fiona Cunningham
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fiona Cunningham is a nonresident scholar in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and was a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow in 2020-21.

  •  
  • Toby Dalton
    Co-director and Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Dalton is the co-director and a senior fellow of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his work addresses regional security challenges and the evolution of the global nuclear order.

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  • Rose Gottemoeller
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Rose Gottemoeller is a nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. She also serves as the Frank E. and Arthur W. Payne Distinguished Lecturer at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

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  • Mark Hibbs
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Hibbs is a Germany-based nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. His areas of expertise are nuclear verification and safeguards, multilateral nuclear trade policy, international nuclear cooperation, and nonproliferation arrangements.

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  • Togzhan Kassenova
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Kassenova is a nonresident fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment.

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  • Ulrich Kühn
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ulrich Kühn is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the head of the arms control and emerging technologies program at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg.

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  • Jamie Kwong
    Stanton Pre-Doctoral Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Jamie Kwong is the Stanton pre-doctoral fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • Ariel (Eli) Levite
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Cyber Policy Initiative

    Levite was the principal deputy director general for policy at the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission from 2002 to 2007.

  •  
  • Thomas MacDonald
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Thomas MacDonald is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Vipin Narang
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Vipin Narang is a nonresident scholar in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • Ankit Panda
    Stanton Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ankit Panda is the Stanton Senior Fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • George Perkovich
    Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Chair
    Vice President for Studies

    Perkovich works primarily on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation issues; cyberconflict; and new approaches to international public-private management of strategic technologies.

  •  
  • Sinan Ülgen
    Visiting Scholar
    Carnegie Europe

    Ülgen is a visiting scholar at Carnegie Europe in Brussels, where his research focuses on Turkish foreign policy, nuclear policy, cyberpolicy, and transatlantic relations.

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  • Tristan Volpe
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Tristan Volpe is a nonresident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and assistant professor of defense analysis at the Naval Postgraduate School.

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  • Fumihiko Yoshida
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fumihiko Yoshida is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  •  
  • Tong Zhao
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

    Tong Zhao is a senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program.

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