Nuclear Policy

 
 

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  • Testimony
    A Critical Conference
    Joseph Cirincione April 28, 2005

    Testimony was given as part of the hearing entitled, "Previewing the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty."

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Putting PSI into Perspective
    Joseph Cirincione, Joshua Williams April 27, 2005

    The Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI) is a good program that has been puffed up out of proportion. While the initiative is a valuable extension of export control implementation, it is not and cannot be a silver bullet to prevent the proliferation of nuclear, biological, or chemical weapons-related materials and equipment to terrorists or states.

     
  • Event
    The Economic and Political Situation in Eurasia: Why Russia is Not Ukraine?
    Yegor Gaidar, Anders Aslund April 21, 2005 Washington, D.C.

    A considerable number of Russian authorities continue to believe in a conspiracy theory in which American imperialism and the CIA play a central role. This conspiracy theory extends to the recent revolutionary events in the post-Soviet countries. However, unless something drastic happens, there will be no revolution in Russia, at least in the short-term perspective.

     
  • Op-Ed
    A Pipeline to Peace
    George Perkovich, Revati Prasad April 18, 2005 New York Times

    India's foreign minister visited Washington last week and met with President Bush and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to discuss a range of mutual interests, from countering China's strategic clout to promoting economic growth and resolving India-Pakistan tensions. Unfortunately, the Bush administration's obsession with Iran threatens to block a major initiative that could advance those goals.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Giving More to Get More from the Nonproliferation Treaty
    Jon Wolfsthal April 14, 2005

    Strengthening the NPT cannot be done by the US alone, but it certainly cannot be done without Washington’s active and constructive support. The U.S. must show that it can and will effectively use the diplomatic tools at its disposal to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    NPT at the Crossroads: How to Prevent a 'Cascade of Proliferation'
    Joshua Williams April 5, 2005

    23 top non-proliferation experts and former government officials have endorsed an agenda to strengthen the NPT. The group agrees that the NPT's future success depends on "universal compliance with tighter rules to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons, more effective regional security strategies, and renewed progress toward fulfillment of... disarmament obligations."

     
  • Event
    Experts Call for Strengthening Nuclear Treaty
    Joseph Cirincione, Daryl Kimball April 5, 2005 Carnegie

    Two former U.S. secretaries of defense, a former U.S. secretary of state, and twenty other nonproliferation experts released a statement today urging all governments to recommit themselves to their obligations under the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) as a bulwark against proliferation.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    You Can’t Handle the Truth
    Joseph Cirincione April 1, 2005

    The president’s commission on intelligence delivered half a report. Like the colonel played by Jack Nicholson in "A Few Good Men," the commission acted as if America can’t handle the truth. The commissioners would have us believe that those who provided the false intelligence were solely to blame, and the senior political leaders who ordered and presented the claims to the public were passive victims. Conservative pundits have quickly declared, "case closed," and urge us to focus on rearranging the deck chairs on the intelligence ship. But buried deep inside the report is evidence that contradicts the commission’s own conclusions and raises serious questions about their recommendations. Most damning is the tale of two CIA analysts who were removed from their positions for "causing waves" when they questioned the reliability of the defector known as "Curveball." (Read More)

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Lock in Nuclear Successes
    Joseph Cirincione, Jane Vaynman March 30, 2005

    While we focus on the important problems of preventing new states or terrorist groups from acquiring nuclear weapons, we must also take decisive action to lock in these past successes.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Enforcing Compliance with the Non-Proliferation Treaty
    Joseph Cirincione March 24, 2005

    As painful experience in Iraq, North Korea, Libya and Iran has shown, the rules that govern nuclear exports, safeguard nuclear materials, and control and eliminate nuclear weapons are not self-enforcing. States and international agencies must struggle to mobilize the power needed to enforce and adapt these rules as conditions change.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Annan Calls for Nuclear Security Reforms in New U.N. Report
    Caterina Dutto March 24, 2005

    U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan calls in a new report for states to renew efforts to improve verification and enforcement measures in the nuclear nonproliferation regime.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    South Korea Should Have a Larger Role in Global Nonproliferation Efforts
    Jon Wolfsthal March 24, 2005 中文

    In just over one month, representative from over 180 countries will meet in New York to review the status and condition of the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. This meeting, which takes place every five years as required by the agreement, occurs in an environment more negative than at anytime in its history and the potential for the month-long meeting to produce a positive result is in serious doubt. South Korea is in a unique position to improve the prospects for a successful meeting and Seoul should take active and even aggressive steps to play a large, constructive role at the meeting. (Read More)

     
  • Op-Ed
    For Tehran, Nuclear Program Is a Matter of National Pride
    George Perkovich March 23, 2005 Yale Global
     
  • Op-Ed
    South Korea Should Have a Larger Role in Global Nonproliferation Efforts
    Jon Wolfsthal March 23, 2005

    In just over one month, representative from over 180 countries will meet in New York to review the status and condition of the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. This meeting, which takes place every five years as required by the agreement, occurs in an environment more negative than at anytime in its history and the potential for the month-long meeting to produce a positive result is in serious doubt. South Korea is in a unique position to improve the prospects for a successful meeting and Seoul should take active and even aggressive steps to play a large, constructive role at the meeting.

     
  • Event
    Iran’s Nuclear Program: The Challenge for Transparency
    George Perkovich, Danielle Pletka, Shaul Bakhash March 23, 2005 Washington, D.C.

    Panel discussion on the challenges posed by Iran's nuclear program featuring Carnegie's George Perkovich.

     
  • Other Publications
    Reinforcing Nuclear Safeguards and the Role of the IAEA
    Pierre Goldschmidt March 17, 2005 March 17

    In this paper presented at a high-level seminar on weapons of mass destruction in Brussels, Belgium, Pierre Goldschmidt discusses ways to increase IAEA verification authority in cases of non-compliance and how the international community should respond when a state decides to withdraw from the NPT.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Cooperative Threat Reduction Beyond Russia
    Rose Gottemoeller March 11, 2005 Washington Quarterly

    In order to be successful, threat reduction programs must take into account the opinions of decisionmakers in recipient countries, as well as the lessons learned from threat reduction programs already in place.

     
  • Testimony
    A New Non-Proliferation Strategy
    Joseph Cirincione March 10, 2005
     
  • Event
    New Blueprint for Non-Proliferation Regime Announced

    Panel discussion and launch of the final report detailing a new international nuclear non-proliferation regime.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Dealing With Iran's Nuclear Challenge
    George Perkovich March 1, 2005

    The possibility of U.S. trade and investment offers a most effective way to enhance Iranian decision-making. Instead of imposing sanctions, which have punished Iranians for 24 years, a better strategy would be to demonstrate the benefits of economic cooperation with the U.S. The simplest first step would be for the U.S. to drop its objection to Iran’s joining the World Trade Organization. Indeed, the greatest resistance to economic reforms sought by Iranian progressives comes from the bazaar, the old-economy conservatives who also back the political-security hardliners. Prospective WTO membership would give progressives a lever to push reforms necessary to satisfy WTO terms and integrate Iran more deeply into the international political economy.

    (Read More)

     
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Carnegie Experts on Nuclear Policy

  • James M. Acton
    Jessica T. Mathews Chair
    Co-director
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Acton holds the Jessica T. Mathews Chair and is co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Fiona Cunningham
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fiona Cunningham is a nonresident scholar in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and was a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow in 2020-21.

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  • Toby Dalton
    Co-director and Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Dalton is the co-director and a senior fellow of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his work addresses regional security challenges and the evolution of the global nuclear order.

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  • Rose Gottemoeller
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Rose Gottemoeller is a nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. She also serves as the Frank E. and Arthur W. Payne Distinguished Lecturer at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

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  • Mark Hibbs
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Hibbs is a Germany-based nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. His areas of expertise are nuclear verification and safeguards, multilateral nuclear trade policy, international nuclear cooperation, and nonproliferation arrangements.

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  • Togzhan Kassenova
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Kassenova is a nonresident fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment.

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  • Ulrich Kühn
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ulrich Kühn is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the head of the arms control and emerging technologies program at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg.

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  • Jamie Kwong
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Jamie Kwong is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Ariel (Eli) Levite
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Technology and International Affairs Program

    Levite was the principal deputy director general for policy at the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission from 2002 to 2007.

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  • Thomas MacDonald
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Thomas MacDonald is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Ankit Panda
    Stanton Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ankit Panda is the Stanton Senior Fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • George Perkovich
    Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Chair
    Vice President for Studies

    Perkovich works primarily on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation issues; cyberconflict; and new approaches to international public-private management of strategic technologies.

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  • Lindsay Rand
    Stanton Pre-Doctoral Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Lindsay Rand is a Stanton pre-doctoral fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Sinan Ülgen
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie Europe

    Sinan Ülgen is a senior fellow at Carnegie Europe in Brussels, where his research focuses on Turkish foreign policy, nuclear policy, cyberpolicy, and transatlantic relations.

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  • Tristan Volpe
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Tristan Volpe is a nonresident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and assistant professor of defense analysis at the Naval Postgraduate School.

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  • Fumihiko Yoshida
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fumihiko Yoshida is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Tong Zhao
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie China

    Tong Zhao is a senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program.

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