Nuclear Policy

 
 

All

  • Event
    Carnegie International Non-Proliferation Conference
    November 7, 2005 Carnegie

    The 2005 Carnegie International Non-Proliferation Conference attracted over 800 experts, officials, and journalists from around the world. The conference provided an open forum for informed discussion on the most pressing nonproliferation issues facing the world today, including Iran, North Korea, and the nuclear fuel cycle.  Visit our conference website to catch up on anything you may have missed, including video and audio, transcripts, presentations, guest bloggers and photo galleries of this amazing two-day event.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Nonproliferation Turns 60
    Jane Vaynman November 1, 2005

    Building the bomb was a feat of engineering and physics; controlling it would take politics and cooperation. This was clear to Harry S Truman when he tabled the first international nonproliferation proposal 60 years ago this November.

    On November 15, 1945, President Truman joined with Prime Minister Clement Attlee of the United Kingdom and Prime Minister William Mackenzie King of Canada in a proposal for the future of atomic energy. The two-page statement called for careful planning by a new international atomic energy commission to be established by the United Nations. The statement itself also explicitly foreshadows the tension between energy needs and security imperatives that continues unresolved decades later. (Read More)

     
  • Op-Ed
    Lessons Lost
    Joseph Cirincione October 31, 2005
     
  • Event
    Security Through Procurement? The Debate Over Taiwan's Defense Spending
    Alexander Huang, Michael D. Swaine October 27, 2005 Washington, D.C.

    On October 28, 2005, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace hosted an off-the-record talk by Taiwanese security expert Dr. Alexander Chieh-cheng Huang. Carnegie Endowment Senior Associate Michael Swaine moderated the discussion.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Congress Cuts Nuclear Bunker-Buster
    Daryl Kimball October 26, 2005

    On Tuesday, October 25, the Chairman of the Senate Energy and Water Appropriations Subcommittee Pete Domenici (R-NM) announced that Senate Energy appropriators would recede to the House position and eliminate funds for the controversial Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator (RNEP) from the fiscal year 2006 budget.

    As a result, for the second year in a row, a bipartisan coalition of forces has denied funding for the RNEP, which should effectively end the research on nuclear earth penetrators.

    The catalyst for the RNEP program was the Pentagon's 2001 Nuclear Posture Review, which called for the United States to develop "new nuclear weapon capabilities" to deal with targets located in deep underground, hardened bunkers. The next year, the Bush administration requested funds for research for a modified, high-yield bomb for this mission. (Read More)

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Living in Limbo
    Stephen Young October 25, 2005

    More than a year after the Bush administration’s self-imposed deadline for deploying an antimissile system, the program appears in limbo, with no signs that the system will be declared operational. There are even signs the administration is giving up on the system.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    The Doctor Is In
    Joseph Cirincione October 19, 2005

    Dr. Zbigniew Brzezinski took his scalpel to the administration’s national security strategy in an opinion piece Oct. 13. Former State Department chief of staff Larry Wilkerson assisted in the surgery with an October 19 speech. The war in Iraq has hurt “America's ability to cope with nuclear nonproliferation,” Brzezinski says.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    China's Nuclear Capabilities
    Caterina Dutto October 18, 2005

    Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld’s first visit to China since taking office is designed to promote dialogue with China’s military. Some recent administration reports and statements argue that China is building up its nuclear forces and is a growing threat to international security. Rumsfeld’s visit comes ahead of President George W. Bush’s scheduled visit to China in November. For current data and analysis of China’s strategic forces, we have provided an excerpt from the China chapter in Carnegie’s recent publication, Deadly Arsenals: Nuclear Biological, and Chemical Threats. (Read More)

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Cleaning House
    Ben Baine October 13, 2005

    The US government program to prevent nuclear materials from vanishing from insecure facilities into the hands of terrorists has scored several striking successes but is still far from accomplishing its goals.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Gold Medal Inspector
    Joseph Cirincione October 7, 2005

    Newly-minted Nobel Laureate Mohamed ElBaradei has been a resolute non-proliferation proponent.   The Nobel Peace Prize is a vote of confidence in his independent voice and the vital role inspections play in verifying compliance with non-proliferation commitments.  During his tenure the IAEA has toughened its inspection regime and he has advanced thoughtful proposals for reforming the nuclear fuel cycle to prevent nations from creeping up to the edge of nuclear weapon status. 

    The award may also reflect the critical efforts he and the IAEA undertook during the build-up to the war in Iraq.  Though belittled at the time by some officials, UN intelligence proved more accurate than U.S. intelligence.  The IAEA was just weeks away from certifying that Iraq had not reconstituted a nuclear weapons program--the chief justification for the invasion.  We present below excerpts from the Carnegie study, WMD in Iraq, detailing the IAEA findings presented to the UN Security Council before the war. 

    We are delighted that the Director-General will deliver his first major address after receiving the Nobel Prize to the Carnegie Non-Proliferation Conference on November 7.  (Read More)

     
  • Op-Ed
    Proliferation Threats and Solutions
    Joseph Cirincione October 3, 2005 Notre Dame Journal of Law
     
  • Op-Ed
    No Good Choices: The Implications of a Nuclear North Korea
    Joseph Cirincione, Jon Wolfsthal October 3, 2005 The Brown Journal of World Affairs
     
  • Book
    Iran Gets the Bomb—Then What?
    George Perkovich October 1, 2005 Strategic Studies Institute

    The acquisition of nuclear weapons by terrorists or any additional states would shake the international system. The more strategically important the state, the greater the potential threat to global security.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Q&A: North Korea Nuclear Talks
    Joseph Cirincione September 29, 2005
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Indian Independence
    Miriam Rajkumar September 20, 2005

    Many U.S. officials and experts are surprised by India’s reluctance to support Iran’s referral to the Security Council. They should not be. Politically, no Indian government can afford to appear subservient to U.S. interests.  New Delhi values an independent foreign policy shaped, as Prime Minister Manmohan Singh has said, by its own geography, economics and domestic considerations. At a press conference in New York on September 16, Prime Minister Singh pointed out that India is located in the region neighboring Iran, that there are three-and-a-half million Indian workers in the Middle East and that India has the second largest Shiite population in the world, trailing only Iran itself.   “Any flare up would present immense difficulties,” he said. (Read More)

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Victory on the Peninsula
    Joseph Cirincione September 19, 2005

    The crisis is not over and there are important verification and implementation details to negotiate. But we have turned an important nuclear corner on the Korean Penninsula.

     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Victory on the Peninsula
    Joseph Cirincione September 19, 2005

    ISSUE BRIEF--The crisis is not over and there are important verification and implementation details to negotiate.  But we have turned an important nuclear corner on the Korean Peninsula.  The new agreement by North Korea to give up all nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programs and return to the Non-Proliferation Treaty is a major success for all the nations in the Six-Party talks.  It is a victory for the United States who insisted on the complete end of these programs.  It is a victory for North Korea, which has won a non-aggression pledge from the US and economic and energy aid.  It is a victory for China, which patiently insisted on solving the stand-off through negotiations and played the key role in reaching the agreement.  Finally, it is a victory for the “Libya model” over the “Iraq model”:  end threats by changing a regime’s behavior, not by eliminating the regime. (Read More)

     
  • Op-Ed
    Decision Time on Iran
    Pierre Goldschmidt September 14, 2005 The New York Times
     
  • Op-Ed
    A Bold Step Forward
    Ashley J. Tellis September 12, 2005 India Today International
     
  • Proliferation Analysis
    Tonnes of Fun
    Ben Bain September 12, 2005

    There are over 3,700 metric tons of plutonium and highly-enriched uranium in global stockpiles, according to a recent report by the Institute for Science and International Security.

     
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Carnegie Experts on Nuclear Policy

  • James M. Acton
    Jessica T. Mathews Chair
    Co-director
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Acton holds the Jessica T. Mathews Chair and is co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Fiona Cunningham
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fiona Cunningham is a nonresident scholar in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and was a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow in 2020-21.

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  • Toby Dalton
    Co-director and Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Dalton is the co-director and a senior fellow of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his work addresses regional security challenges and the evolution of the global nuclear order.

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  • Rose Gottemoeller
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Rose Gottemoeller is a nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. She also serves as the Frank E. and Arthur W. Payne Distinguished Lecturer at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

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  • Mark Hibbs
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Hibbs is a Germany-based nonresident senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. His areas of expertise are nuclear verification and safeguards, multilateral nuclear trade policy, international nuclear cooperation, and nonproliferation arrangements.

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  • Togzhan Kassenova
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Kassenova is a nonresident fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment.

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  • Ulrich Kühn
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ulrich Kühn is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the head of the arms control and emerging technologies program at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg.

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  • Jamie Kwong
    Stanton Pre-Doctoral Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Jamie Kwong is the Stanton pre-doctoral fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Ariel (Eli) Levite
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Cyber Policy Initiative

    Levite was the principal deputy director general for policy at the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission from 2002 to 2007.

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  • Thomas MacDonald
    Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Thomas MacDonald is a fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Ankit Panda
    Stanton Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Ankit Panda is the Stanton Senior Fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • George Perkovich
    Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Chair
    Vice President for Studies

    Perkovich works primarily on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation issues; cyberconflict; and new approaches to international public-private management of strategic technologies.

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  • Sinan Ülgen
    Visiting Scholar
    Carnegie Europe

    Ülgen is a visiting scholar at Carnegie Europe in Brussels, where his research focuses on Turkish foreign policy, nuclear policy, cyberpolicy, and transatlantic relations.

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  • Tristan Volpe
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Tristan Volpe is a nonresident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and assistant professor of defense analysis at the Naval Postgraduate School.

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  • Fumihiko Yoshida
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Fumihiko Yoshida is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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  • Tong Zhao
    Senior Fellow
    Carnegie China

    Tong Zhao is a senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program.

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