Andrew S. Weiss

James Family Chair
Vice President for Studies
Weiss is the James Family Chair and vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment, where he oversees research in Washington and Moscow on Russia and Eurasia.
 

Education

M.I.A, Columbia University
B.A., Russian Regional Studies, Columbia University

Languages

English; Russian

 

Andrew S. Weiss is the James Family Chair and vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he oversees research in Washington and Moscow on Russia and Eurasia. During the 2021-2022 academic year, he is also the Library of Congress Chair in U.S.-Russia Relations at the John W. Kluge Center.

Prior to joining Carnegie, he was director of the RAND Corporation’s Center for Russia and Eurasia and executive director of the RAND Business Leaders Forum.

Weiss’s career has spanned both the public and private sectors. He previously served as director for Russian, Ukrainian, and Eurasian Affairs on the National Security Council staff, as a member of the State Department’s Policy Planning Staff, and as a policy assistant in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy during the administrations of Presidents Bill Clinton and George H. W. Bush.

Before joining RAND, Weiss was a vice president and investment strategist at American International Group, Inc. subsidiary companies, where he worked primarily on global commodities, energy, and foreign exchange markets.

  • Op-Ed Wall Street Journal November 22, 2021
    For Putin, the Great Prize Has Always Been Ukraine

    But one significant piece of unfinished business remains, and that is Ukraine. For the man who dubbed the breakup of the Soviet Union the greatest geopolitical catastrophe of the 20th century, the ultimate prize would be bringing Ukraine and its capital Kyiv, which the official historiography portrays as the medieval cradle of Russia’s greatness and statehood, back into the fold.

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  • Russian President Vladimir Putin is seen at the Bocharov Ruchei state residence
    Article November 12, 2021
    Ukraine: Putin’s Unfinished Business

    Putin has stepped up his rhetoric about Ukraine throughout 2021. With new moves on the Russian-Ukrainian border, the saber-rattling has to be taken seriously.

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  • Op-Ed Foreign Affairs October 18, 2021
    Russia Is No Mideast Superpower

    There is no question that Washington’s position in the broader Middle East was dented by the fiasco in Afghanistan. Ultimately, however, U.S. assets in the region are still unrivaled: the United States’ political and economic influence, hard power, soft power, embrace of multilateral diplomacy, and leadership of a rules-based global order continue to give it the upper hand over all its rivals.

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  • Putin in Egypt
    Paper August 31, 2021
    Reassessing Russian Capabilities in the Levant and North Africa

    The challenge for Western policymakers is to avoid viewing Russian activism in the Eastern Mediterranean and North Africa through an exclusively zero-sum lens. The region’s political disarray, complexities, and especially the unpredictability of local rulers all present built-in buffers to Russian influence—as they do to all external players.

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  • Op-Ed Financial Times June 15, 2021
    Biden’s Summit with Putin Offers a Chance to Reaffirm U.S. Resolve

    Russian leader Vladimir Putin is skilled at making life difficult for the West at little cost to his autocracy.

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  • Russias President Vladimir Putin (L front) visits the Russian Government Coordinationa Council.
    Paper April 29, 2021
    New Tools, Old Tricks: Emerging Technologies and Russia’s Global Tool Kit

    Russia has long struggled to overcome its inability to retain talent for homegrown innovation and R&D. As a result, Russia’s global activism leans heavily on tried-and-true tactics.

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  • Silhouettes of the Moscow Kremlin
    Article March 9, 2021
    Back to Basics on Russia Policy

    The arrival of the Biden administration offers an opportunity to rebuild the common transatlantic approach to Russia. To get there both sides will have to compromise.

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  • Carnegie.ru Commentary November 24, 2020
    Podcast: What (If Anything) Does Russia Expect From Biden?

    Under Donald Trump, U.S.-Russian relations hit rock bottom and a record number of sanctions were imposed against Russia. Will a Biden administration bring change for better or worse?

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  • Russia and Europe: Stuck on Autopilot
    Paper September 24, 2020
    Russia and Europe: Stuck on Autopilot

    Russia’s relations with Europe are getting worse. Time and again, it is Moscow’s own overreach and missteps that encourage greater Western unity, or at the very least leave the Europeans no alternative to confronting Russia.

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  • July 8, 2020
    Steady State: Russian Foreign Policy After Coronavirus

    The coronavirus pandemic has hastened the arrival of a new era of bipolarity. The short essays in this panoramic collection examine the various implications of the pandemic for Russia’s foreign relations.

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  • China-Russia Relations at the Dawn of the Biden Era
    May 12, 2021 Live Online
    China-Russia Relations at the Dawn of the Biden Era

    While U.S.-China and U.S.-Russia relations have steadily deteriorated, China-Russia cooperation has grown in its stead. Paul Haenle will moderate a discussion on recent developments in China-Russia relations and their implications for the United States.

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  • The Long Crackdown: Russian Society After the Navalny Protests
    April 28, 2021 Live Online
    The Long Crackdown: Russian Society After the Navalny Protests

    The Russian government’s brutal treatment of opposition leader Alexei Navalny has provoked widespread international anger. Yet support for Navalny at home remains surprisingly thin.

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  • Taking It to the Streets: Navalny, the Kremlin, and Popular Protest in Russia
    January 29, 2021 Live Online
    Taking It to the Streets: Navalny, the Kremlin, and Popular Protest in Russia

    Last weekend, Russians angry over high-level corruption and the arrest of opposition leader Alexei Navalny protested in 120 cities across the country. How significant is the threat of these protests to President Putin’s leadership? And how will his government respond to the unexpected and well-organized display of popular anger?

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  • Promoting Stability in Wider Europe: A Conversation with the Swedish Foreign Minister
    January 28, 2021 Live Online
    Promoting Stability in Wider Europe: A Conversation with the Swedish Foreign Minister

    Join Carnegie for a timely conversation with Swedish Foreign Minister Ann Linde on Sweden’s current foreign policy priorities and priorities for the OSCE.

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  • Standoff or Turning Point: Will the Belarus Protests Trigger a Russian Onslaught?
    October 1, 2020 Live online
    Russian Neo-Imperialism and its Limits

    Join us for an in-depth conversation about the increasingly vexed relationship between Russia and its neighbors and the wider geopolitical implications of the crisis in Belarus.

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  • Putin’s People: A Conversation with Catherine Belton
    July 7, 2020 Live Online
    Putin’s People: A Conversation with Catherine Belton

    Drawing on extensive reporting from her years as a Moscow-based correspondent for the Financial Times and other publications, Catherine Belton has assembled a fascinating portrait of Vladimir Putin’s rise to power and two decades at the helm of the Russian state.

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  • COVID and the Kremlin: A Conversation with Elizaveta Osetinskaya and Mikhail Zygar
    June 30, 2020 Live Online
    COVID and the Kremlin: A Conversation with Elizaveta Osetinskaya and Mikhail Zygar

    On July 1 Russian citizens will vote on constitutional changes that could extend President Putin’s term in office until 2036. It’s notable that the Kremlin has placed higher priority on enacting these changes than contending with the pandemic.

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  • COVID and the Kremlin: A Conversation with Alexander Baunov and Ekaterina Schulmann
    June 3, 2020 Live Online
    COVID and the Kremlin: A Conversation with Alexander Baunov and Ekaterina Schulmann

    Is the world misreading the potential threat that the coronavirus represents for the Russian political system and President Putin’s hold on power? Are we overlooking the sources of resilience and inertia that are helping bolster a regime in its hour of greatest need?

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  • COVID and the Kremlin: A Conversation with Sergei Guriev
    April 23, 2020 Live Online
    COVID and the Kremlin: A Conversation with Sergei Guriev

    Why is the Kremlin holding back on a major economic rescue package for its hard-hit economy? So far, the Putin regime has relied primarily on a decidedly modest set of targeted economic measures that fall far short of the tools utilized by the world’s major economies.

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  • Are Trump and Putin Cooking Up a New Reset?
    April 20, 2020 Live Online
    Are Trump and Putin Cooking Up a New Reset?

    Over the past two weeks, contacts between Presidents Trump and Putin have accelerated dramatically. Putin is trying to make common cause with the United States to deal with a deadly enemy, but is such a reset possible?

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