Evan A. Feigenbaum

Vice President for Studies tel +1 773 702 1799
Evan A. Feigenbaum is vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he oversees research in Washington, Beijing, and New Delhi on a dynamic region encompassing both East Asia and South Asia.
 

Education

PhD, AM, Political Science, Stanford University
AB, History, University of Michigan

 

Languages

Chinese; English; French

 

Evan A. Feigenbaum is vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he oversees research in Washington, Beijing, and New Delhi on a dynamic region encompassing both East Asia and South Asia. He was also the 2019-20 James R. Schlesinger Distinguished Professor at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia, where he is now a practitioner senior fellow. Initially an academic with a PhD in Chinese politics from Stanford University, Feigenbaum’s career has spanned government service, think tanks, the private sector, and three major regions of Asia.

From 2001 to 2009, he served at the U.S. State Department as deputy assistant secretary of state for South Asia (2007–2009), deputy assistant secretary of state for Central Asia (2006–2007), member of the policy planning staff with principal responsibility for East Asia and the Pacific (2001–2006), and an adviser on China to Deputy Secretary of State Robert B. Zoellick, with whom he worked closely in the development of the U.S.-China senior dialogue.

During the intensive final phase of the U.S.-India civil nuclear initiative from July to October 2008, he co-chaired the coordinating team charged with moving the initiative through the International Atomic Energy Agency Board of Governors and the Nuclear Suppliers Group and then to Congress, where it became the U.S.-India Nuclear Cooperation Approval and Nonproliferation Enhancement Act. He negotiated agreements with the governments of Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan and also has extensive policy experience with North and South Korea, Japan, and Australia. He received three individual and two group superior honor awards from the State Department.

Following government service, Feigenbaum worked in the private and nonprofit sectors: He was vice chairman of the Paulson Institute at the University of Chicago, and the co-founder of MacroPolo, its digital venture on the Chinese economy; head of the Asia practice at the markets consultancy Eurasia Group, a global political risk consulting firm; and senior fellow for East, Central, and South Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations. Before government service, he worked at Harvard University (1997–2001) as lecturer on government in the faculty of arts and sciences and as executive director of the Asia-Pacific Security Initiative and program chair of the Chinese Security Studies Program in the John F. Kennedy School of Government. He taught at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School (1994–1995) as lecturer of national security affairs and was a consultant on China to the RAND Corporation (1993–1994).

He is the author of three books and monographs, including The United States in the New Asia (CFR, 2009, co-author) and China’s Techno-Warriors: National Security and Strategic Competition from the Nuclear to the Information Age (Stanford University Press, 2003), which was selected by Foreign Affairs as a best book of 2003 on the Asia-Pacific, as well as numerous articles and essays.

  • Data Center Full of Rack Servers
    August 17, 2021
    The Korean Way With Data: How the World’s Most Wired Country Is Forging a Third Way

    This volume digs deeply into what we call “the Korean way with data.” It explores Korea’s distinctive experiences, successes, failures, and recalibrations. And it aims to address the question of what can and should be learned from innovative Korean policies and practices.

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  • How Biden Can Make the Quad Endure
    Article March 11, 2021
    How Biden Can Make the Quad Endure

    To succeed, the Quad needs to evolve from a China-focused club of four to a group of first movers on an array of specific functional challenges. The best way to do this is for the four countries to form the core of a rotating set of ad hoc problem-solving coalitions in the Indo-Pacific.

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  • How Standard Setting Can Help Taiwan Grow Its Global Role
    Article March 9, 2021
    How Standard Setting Can Help Taiwan Grow Its Global Role

    Taiwan’s prowess in high-tech manufacturing and data privacy could make Taiwan firms unsung heroes of the global competition over standard setting for emerging technologies.

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  • Deepening the U.S.-Taiwan Economic Partnership
    Article March 4, 2021
    Deepening the U.S.-Taiwan Economic Partnership

    A U.S.-Taiwan trade pact would be welcome, but laying the groundwork will take time, and the two sides risk losing momentum. Several other shovel-ready economic initiatives could be ready sooner and shouldn’t be delayed.

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  • Op-Ed National Interest December 22, 2020
    Meeting the Challenge in Asia

    To succeed in Asia, President-elect Joe Biden will need an administration that whines less, competes more, and leverages American strengths in the Asia that actually exists, not the one of its wishes, dreams, and fantasies.

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  • Live Recording Replay: U.S.-China Relations Under Biden – A Look Ahead
    Podcast December 3, 2020
    Live Recording Replay: U.S.-China Relations Under Biden: A Look Ahead

    While the recent election of Joe Biden likely signals a raft of domestic political changes, its impact on U.S.-China relations remains unclear. The Trump administration has remolded the relationship, which is now defined by confrontations over economic practices, emerging technologies, and security.

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  • Miller Center November 30, 2020
    Evolving U.S. Policy Toward Central and South Asia: Lessons from the Bush Administration

    Before China had its “Belt and Road,” the United States actively shaped the future of Eurasia, proposing connectivity initiatives in Central Asia and dramatically reshaping its relationship with India.

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  • Miller Center November 20, 2020
    China’s Evolution as a Global Power: Lessons from the Bush Administration

    Even before people perceived China as a global player, Beijing was pressed to step up to global responsibilities by the events of September 11, 2001, and the Bush administration’s policies around terrorism and Afghanistan.

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  • How Taiwan Can Turn Coronavirus Victory Into Economic Success
    Op-Ed Foreign Policy June 1, 2020
    How Taiwan Can Turn Coronavirus Victory Into Economic Success

    Taiwan’s coronavirus success was based on efficient coordination across the public and private sectors coupled with innovative deployment of advanced technology.

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  • Taiwan Was Having a Terrific U.S.-China Trade War Until Coronavirus Arrived
    Op-Ed National Interest April 28, 2020
    Taiwan Was Having a Terrific U.S.-China Trade War Until Coronavirus Arrived

    Taiwan is a victim of its past success—dominating important industries, such as semiconductors, but underinvesting in the new fields.

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  • NPR March 12, 2021
    Quad Leaders Announce Effort To Get 1 Billion COVID-19 Vaccines To Asia

    The leaders of U.S., Japan, Australia and India met at a virtual summit today where they announced a major initiative to get 1 billion vaccines to fight the coronavirus pandemic in Asia.

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  • SupChina December 17, 2020
    Veteran Diplomat on U.S. Policy in a Changing Asia

    Expert details what the increasing economic integration of the region has meant that the U.S. faces the threat of marginalization and relegation to a unidimensional role as a security provider.

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  • Grand Tamasha November 24, 2020
    Evan Feigenbaum on Asia’s Fragmented Future

    Of the many questions being asked about U.S. president-elect Joe Biden’s foreign policy, chief among them is how the new president might handle relations with China. The future trajectory of U.S.-China relations matters not just for the United States and China, but it also has real implications for India—its economics, politics, and foreign policy.

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  • Paulson Institute August 11, 2020
    Straight Talk with Hank Paulson

    Experts discuss how the United States, particularly in Asia, was standard setter through which other economies had to adjust and accommodate.

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  • Interpreting India April 23, 2020
    Future of US-China Relations Post-Coronavirus

    A discussion of how the coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated the geopolitical and economic competition between the United States and China and their prospects for cooperation.

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  • Voice of America February 1, 2020
    U.S.-Central Asia: Interview with Washington’s Former Point Man

    Despite the significant changes that have happened in Central Asia, U.S. talking points and messaging for the region have remained largely consistent for decades.

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  • University of Virginia October 24, 2019
    China: Where Things Stand

    What is the long-term future of the U.S.-China relationship?

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  • Power Dynamics and the "Two Asias": A Conversation with Evan Feigenbaum
    ChinaPower February 1, 2018 中文
    Power Dynamics and the “Two Asias”

    How China and the United States exert influence in Asia and the evolving roles of each in the region.

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  • A Chinese train destined for Kazakhstan
    CNBC May 14, 2017
    China Didn’t Invent Asian Connectivity

    China hopes to use three strengths to make the Belt and Road Initiative a success: its large foreign exchange reserves, dominance in certain infrastructure fields, and unique forms of state backed project finance.

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  • CNBC October 16, 2016
    TPP More Than Just About Business

    The Trans-Pacific Partnership is a necessary condition for the United States to establish a market-oriented and open regional economic order in the Asia-Pacific.

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  • China’s Impact in Strategic Regions
    October 21, 2021 Live Online
    China’s Impact on Strategic Regions

    China’s global footprint has expanded exponentially in recent years, becoming a source of investment for countries around the world. But notably, many nations have struggled to grapple with the accompanying implications and political risks.

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  • Ocean Nations: An Indo-Pacific Islands Dialogue 
    September 20, 2021 Japan Society, New York City
    Ocean Nations: An Indo-Pacific Islands Dialogue 

    Join us for a special two-day dialogue on security in the Indo-Pacific and island nations' perceptions of regional priorities and challenges.

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  • How Korea Can Unleash the Power of Data
    September 15, 2021 Live Online
    How Korea Can Unleash the Power of Data

    The United States, Europe, and China are not the only major digital players crafting the data policies that are shaping the Internet, the cloud, and the software and apps using them. A new volume edited by Evan A. Feigenbaum and Michael Nelson explores what lessons can be learned from South Korea.

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  • Indian Ocean Initiative Launch
    September 14, 2021 Live Online
    Indian Ocean Initiative Launch

    Join us for the celebratory launch of Carnegie’s Indian Ocean Initiative, a forum to examine the nexus of economic, geopolitical, and security interests in the Indian Ocean and its island states and territories.

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  • The U.S and Taiwan After COVID: Preparing for the Next Crisis
    April 27, 2021 Live Online
    The U.S and Taiwan After COVID: Preparing for the Next Crisis

    For nearly two decades Taiwan and the United States have battled an escalating series of public health crises, from SARS to COVID-19. And since COVID-19 is unlikely to be the last such crisis, public health should be an arena for growing U.S.-Taiwan cooperation.

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  • A New Order for the U.S. and Asia — India
    March 31, 2021 Live Online
    A New Order for the U.S. and Asia: What Kind of US-India Partnership?

    The United States and India have grown increasingly close. But even as Washington’s ambitions for the partnership expand exponentially, India’s foreign policy is in transition.

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  • A Global Renewal? What to Expect in 2021
    December 16, 2020 Live on YouTube @CarnegieMENA عربي
    A Global Renewal? What to Expect in 2021

    The conference will consist of six virtual discussions that will provide a look ahead to 2021, focusing on what Carnegie scholars and other experts believe will be the most significant and challenging issues facing the Middle East and North Africa in their interaction with international actors.

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  • International Actors in the Emerging Middle East: Russia, China, and the EU
    December 15, 2020 YouTube @CarnegieMENA عربي
    International Actors in the Emerging Middle East: Russia, China, and the EU

    Held on Dec. 15 from 12:30-1:30 p.m. EST (7:30-8:30 p.m. Beirut). This panel will explore the expanding influence of external powers such as Russia, the European Union and China in the Middle East, the alignments that they have formed, and the dynamics that have been unleashed by their intervention. Panelists will also discuss how changes in the policies of the United States may impact these dynamics.

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  • A New Order for the U.S. and Asia — Asia Beyond America?
    December 10, 2020 Live online
    A New Order for the U.S. and Asia — Asia Beyond America?

    In the first of a series of events on “A New Order for the U.S. and Asia,” three veteran policymakers—Chan Heng Chee, Michael Froman, and Shivshankar Menon—sit down with Evan Feigenbaum to explore whether and how Asians are passing America by, and how Washington should adapt.

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  • U.S.-China Relations Under Biden: A Look Ahead
    December 1, 2020 Live online
    U.S.-China Relations Under Biden: A Look Ahead

    One month after the U.S. election, Paul Haenle will moderate a discussion with American and Chinese experts on how the Biden administration will approach China, as well as how Beijing is gearing up for the new U.S. president.

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Source: http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/index.cfm?fa=expert_view&expert_id=719
 
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