Frederic Wehrey

Senior Fellow
Middle East Program
tel +1 202 939 2232
Frederic Wehrey is a senior fellow in the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. His research deals with armed conflict, security sector governance, and U.S. policy, with a focus on Libya, North Africa, and the Gulf.
 

Education

PhD, International Relations, St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford
MA, Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University

Languages

Arabic; English

 

Frederic Wehrey is a senior fellow in the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. His research deals with armed conflict, security sector governance, and U.S. policy, with a focus on Libya, North Africa, and the Gulf

His essays, reporting, analyses, and opinion pieces have appeared in the New York Review of Books, the Atlantic, the New Yorker, TIME, POLITICO, the London Review of Books, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, Small Wars and Insurgencies, the Journal of North African Studies, Mediterranean Politics, the Chicago Journal of International Law, and the Journal of Democracy. He has been interviewed by major media outlets such as NPR, ABC News, CNN, PBS NewsHour, and the BBC. He has served as a consultant to the United Nations and has testified before the U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives.

He is the author of The Burning Shores: Inside the Battle for the New Libya (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2018), which the New York Times called “the essential text on the country’s disintegration.” His previous book, Sectarian Politics in the Gulf: From the Iraq War to the Arab Uprisings (Columbia University Press, 2013), was named a “Best Book on the Middle East” by Foreign Affairs and Foreign Policy magazines in 2014 and 2013, respectively.

Before joining Carnegie, Wehrey was a senior policy analyst at the RAND Corporation, leading research projects on Iran’s Revolutionary Guards, Iranian influence in the Middle East, the strategic impact of the Iraq War, and Saudi-Iranian relations. He also served for twenty-one years in the active and reserve components of the U.S. Air Force, with tours across the Middle East and in North and East Africa.

He holds a doctorate in International Relations from Oxford University and a Master’s in Near Eastern Studies from Princeton University. He studied Arabic at Cairo University, the University of Jordan, and the Yemen Language Center in Sana’a.

  • Op-Ed New York Review of Books December 18, 2021
    The Many Repercussions of the Rif Rebellion

    The Berber revolt of the 1920s reverberates across a century of history to this day.

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  • Op-Ed ISPI December 16, 2021
    Libyan Armed Groups and the “Day After” Elections

    The alleged bright spots of stability and cooperation among former adversaries that have marked the pre-election period in Libya have been largely the result of transactional deal-making by elites and, given their highly personal nature, are fickle and susceptible to adjustment or unraveling.

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  • November 12, 2021
    The Lost Decade: DDR and SSR Lessons in Libya Since 2011

    Socioeconomic and political obstacles have long inhibited successful security sector reforms in Libya since the overthrow of Muammar Gaddafi in 2011. Understanding these factors and drawing lessons from previously aborted DDR/SSR efforts is crucial to avoid future pitfalls and a possible relapse into conflict.

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  • Op-Ed Foreign Affairs October 18, 2021
    Russia Is No Mideast Superpower

    There is no question that Washington’s position in the broader Middle East was dented by the fiasco in Afghanistan. Ultimately, however, U.S. assets in the region are still unrivaled: the United States’ political and economic influence, hard power, soft power, embrace of multilateral diplomacy, and leadership of a rules-based global order continue to give it the upper hand over all its rivals.

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  • Putin in Egypt
    Paper August 31, 2021
    Reassessing Russian Capabilities in the Levant and North Africa

    The challenge for Western policymakers is to avoid viewing Russian activism in the Eastern Mediterranean and North Africa through an exclusively zero-sum lens. The region’s political disarray, complexities, and especially the unpredictability of local rulers all present built-in buffers to Russian influence—as they do to all external players.

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  • Op-Ed New Lines Magazine July 14, 2021
    A Libyan Revenant

    In June 2017, Saudi authorities at the immigration counter at the King Abdulaziz International Airport in Jeddah pulled aside for questioning two young Libyan men who were flying back to Libya after performing the umrah pilgrimage.

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  • Islamic Institutions in Arab States: Mapping the Dynamics of Control, Co-option, and Contention
    June 7, 2021 عربي
    Islamic Institutions in Arab States: Mapping the Dynamics of Control, Co-option, and Contention

    The complex relations between the state and Islamic institutions in Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Syria, Libya, Egypt, Algeria, and Morocco shed light on evolving governance and have important implications for Western policies of countering violent extremism and conflict resolution.

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  • From Hardware to Holism: Rebalancing America’s Security Engagement With Arab States
    May 18, 2021 عربي
    From Hardware to Holism: Rebalancing America’s Security Engagement With Arab States

    U.S. security policy with Arab states has long needed a major overhaul. This compendium presents different arguments and proposals for how the United States can do just this.

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  • Op-Ed New York Review of Books February 16, 2021
    The Lost Rivers of Owens Valley

    In 2012, archaeologists working with the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power made an unsettling find at the edge of an alkali flat known as Owens Lake, at the southern end of the Owens Valley in eastern California.

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  • Biden’s Challenge:  Escaping the Legacy of Arab Adventurism
    Op-Ed Politico November 24, 2020
    How Joe Biden Can Rein in Donald Trump’s Reckless Middle East Policy

    As president, Joe Biden will have to grapple with the aftermath of Emirati adventurism and the habits of other authoritarian Arab allies that have been lavished with American military support, not just under Trump but under previous administrations, as well.

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  • Ultimate Authority: The Struggle for Islamic Institutions in the Arab World
    June 8, 2021 Live Online
    Ultimate Authority: The Struggle for Islamic Institutions in the Arab World

    Please join the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace Middle East program for a public discussion marking the launch of a new edited volume, “Islamic Institutions in Arab States: Mapping the Dynamics of Control, Co-option, and Contention.”

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  • Re-balancing U.S. Security Engagement with Arab States
    May 26, 2021 Live Online
    Re-balancing U.S. Security Engagement with Arab States

    Please join the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace Middle East program for a public discussion marking the launch of a new edited volume, “From Hardware to Holism: Re-balancing America's Security Engagement with Arab States.”

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  • North Africa in Transition
    December 16, 2020 YouTube @CarnegieMENA عربي
    North Africa: Tension as the New Normal?

    Held on Dec. 16 from 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. EST (5:30-7:00 p.m. Beirut). North Africa has witnessed a tumultuous year with persistent conflict in Libya, popular protests in Algeria, tensions between Egypt and Ethiopia over Addis Ababa’s building of a dam on the Nile, and recent skirmishes in the West Sahara, which might threaten the region’s stability. Panelists will explore the implications of these unfolding dynamics and discuss the future of the region’s autocratic regimes, geopolitical rivalries, as well as the alliances that will shape North Africa in 2021.

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  • A Global Renewal? What to Expect in 2021
    December 16, 2020 Live on YouTube @CarnegieMENA عربي
    A Global Renewal? What to Expect in 2021

    The conference will consist of six virtual discussions that will provide a look ahead to 2021, focusing on what Carnegie scholars and other experts believe will be the most significant and challenging issues facing the Middle East and North Africa in their interaction with international actors.

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  • The Scramble for Libya:  A Globalized Civil War at Tipping Point
    July 8, 2020 Carnegie Live
    The Scramble for Libya: A Globalized Civil War at Tipping Point

    In the wake of recent battlefield developments in Libya, regional and global powers are maneuvering for influence and supremacy, with far-reaching implications for Libyan sovereignty, stability, and cohesion.

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  • June 4, 2020 YouTube @CarnegieMENA
    Arming for Pandemic: Military Responses to COVID-19 in the Arab World

    The coronavirus pandemic is changing perspectives on governance and how armed forces interact with society, but nowhere is this more salient than in the Arab world.

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  • Does Democracy Have a Future in the Arab World?
    February 27, 2020 Washington, DC
    Does U.S. Democracy Promotion Have a Future in the Arab World?

    Amid civil wars, proxy rivalries, and seemingly entrenched authoritarianism, U.S. policies of democracy promotion in the Arab world are facing unprecedented challenges. Does the U.S. advancement of democracy in the Arab world have any future?

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  • Salafism in the Maghreb
    January 9, 2020 Washington, DC
    Salafism in the Maghreb

    A dynamic region amidst great change, the Maghreb is also home to the conservative, literalist interpretation of Islam known as Salafism, which has emerged as a major social and political force.

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  • The Challenges of Governance and Security in North Africa and the Sahel
    May 8, 2018 Washington, DC
    Governance and Security in North Africa and the Sahel

    Please join Carnegie for a conference on the changing political, socioeconomic, and security dynamics within the Maghreb-Sahel region.

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  • The Battle for the New Libya
    April 24, 2018 Washington, DC
    The Battle for the New Libya

    The death of Muammar Qadhafi in 2011 freed Libya from forty-two years of despotic rule, raising hopes for a new era. But in the aftermath of the uprising, the country descended into bitter rivalries and civil war, paving the way for the Islamic State and a catastrophic migrant crisis. What went wrong?

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Source: http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/index.cfm?fa=expert_view&expert_id=709
 
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