Togzhan Kassenova

Nonresident Fellow
Nuclear Policy Program
Kassenova is a nonresident fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment.
 

Education

PhD, Politics, University of Leeds
MA, Euro-Asian Studies, University of Reading
MA, Financial Integrity, Case Western University
BA, International Studies, Almaty State University 

Languages

English; Portuguese; Russian

 

Dr. Togzhan Kassenova is a nonresident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Kassenova is a senior fellow with the Project on International Security, Commerce, and Economic Statecraft (PISCES) at the Center for Policy Research, SUNY-Albany, a senior non-resident scholar at the Institute for International Science and Technology Policy, and adjunct faculty at the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University.

She is an expert on nuclear politics, WMD nonproliferation, and financial crime prevention. She currently works on issues related to proliferation financing controls, exploring ways to minimize access of proliferators to the global financial system.

Previously, Kassenova worked as a senior research associate at the University of Georgia’s Center for International Trade and Security in Washington, DC, as a postdoctoral fellow at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, and as an adjunct faculty member at the Monterey Institute of International Studies.

Kassenova holds a Ph.D. in Politics from the University of Leeds and is a Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialist (CAMS).

From 2011 to 2015 Kassenova served on the UN secretary general’s Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters.

Kassenova is the author of From Antagonism to Partnership: The Uneasy Path of the U.S.-Russian Cooperative Threat Reduction (2007) and Brazil’s Nuclear Kaleidoscope: An Evolving Identity (2014). Her latest publications include “Challenges With Implementing Proliferation Financing Controls: How Export Controls Can Help,” “Banning Nuclear Testing: Lessons From the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site,” and “Brazil, Argentina, and the Politics of Global Nonproliferation and Nuclear Safeguards.”

  • Nuclear Shades of Red Racism
    Inkstick September 24, 2020
    Nuclear Shades of Red Racism

    Discussions of racial injustice in the United States are shaking the public sphere, but racism, injustice, and discrimination are not prerogatives of the West. They ride on the back of power disparities the world over.

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  • Prospects for Nuclear Governance in Brazil
    FGV School of International Relations March 10, 2020
    Prospects for Nuclear Governance in Brazil

    Brazil’s nuclear policy is at a critical juncture. Efforts to reform the sector’s governance will have serious implications for nuclear safety and security, the private sector, civilian-military relations, policy accountability, and the future prospects of Brazil’s nuclear capabilities.

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  • The Exploitation of the Global Financial Systems for Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Proliferation
    Testimony House of Representatives Financial Services Committee March 4, 2020
    The Exploitation of the Global Financial Systems for Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Proliferation

    Proliferators take advantage of formal financial institutions to enable surreptitious nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons programs. Despite a number of challenges for financial institutions, they can be critical in the fight against illicit activity.

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  • Brazil’s Nuclear Posture Under Bolsonaro
    Arms Control Today September 18, 2019
    Brazil’s Nuclear Posture Under Bolsonaro

    Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has unveiled plans for an ambitious transformation of the country’s nuclear policy. Achieving this vision will require an updated regulatory framework to respond to new challenges.

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  • 2019 U.N. North Korea Panel of Experts Report: Takeaways for Financial Institutions
    ACAMS Today March 27, 2019
    2019 U.N. North Korea Panel of Experts Report: Takeaways for Financial Institutions

    The United Nations North Korea Panel of Experts report released in March confirms that North Korea continues to evade U.N. sanctions. The implementation of financial sanctions remains one of the main challenges for governments and financial institutions around the world.

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  • Challenges with Implementing Proliferation Financing Controls: How Export Controls Can Help
    World ECR: The Journal of Export Controls and Sanctions May 30, 2018
    Challenges With Implementing Proliferation Financing Controls: How Export Controls Can Help

    Detecting proliferation-relevant illicit financing is even harder than detecting money laundering or terrorism financing.

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  • Nonproliferation Review August 9, 2017
    External Perceptions of Brazil’s Nuclear Policy: Views From Argentina and the United States

    Despite recent setbacks to its nuclear program, Brazil remains a significant player in global nuclear matters. Argentina and the United States are the two countries that most closely follow Brazil’s nuclear policy and whose opinions matter most to Brazil.

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  • Banning Nuclear Testing: Lessons From the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site
    Nonproliferation Review March 10, 2017
    Banning Nuclear Testing: Lessons From the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site

    The story of Semipalatinsk nuclear test site demonstrates the tremendous economic, political, human, and environmental costs of nuclear testing and the perils associated with nuclear-weapon programs.

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  • Brazil, Argentina, and the Politics of Global Nonproliferation and Nuclear Safeguards
    Editora UFSM, Federal University of Santa Maria. November 29, 2016
    Brazil, Argentina, and the Politics of Global Nonproliferation and Nuclear Safeguards

    As possessors of advanced nuclear technology, Brazil and Argentina bear special responsibility for helping the international community and neighbors in their region feel confident that their nuclear programs are peaceful, secure, and safe.

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  • Report June 6, 2016 Full Text
    Perspectives on the Evolving Nuclear Order

    The global nuclear order appears increasingly tense, primarily because many states feel that the structure and distribution of benefits is unjust. Among the states that will determine how the nuclear order will adapt, Argentina, Brazil, China, India, and Pakistan are particularly important.

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  • CCTV America May 26, 2016
    President Obama’s Visit to Hiroshima

    What does President Obama’s visit to Hiroshima mean for his nuclear legacy?

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  • Al Jazeera’s Inside Story April 1, 2016
    How Worried Should We Be About ‘Nuclear Terrorism’?

    What have international efforts achieved so far in preventing a nuclear terrorist attack, and what remains to be done.

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  • CCTV America March 31, 2016
    On Progress In Nuclear Security

    The 2016 Nuclear Security Summit highlighted some major successes in nuclear security, but also some of the serious challenges that still must be overcome.

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  • CCTV March 24, 2014
    Brazil Going Nuclear?

    Brazil currently has two nuclear reactors and a third is under construction. Four more power plants are being proposed for construction in the 2020s.

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Source: http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/index.cfm?fa=expert_view&expert_id=606

Areas of Expertise

 
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