Jodi Vittori

Nonresident Scholar
Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program
Jodi Vittori is a nonresident scholar in the Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program. She is an expert on the linkages of corruption, state fragility, illicit finance, and U.S. national security.
 
 

Jodi Vittori is a nonresident scholar in the Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program. She is an expert on the linkages of corruption, state fragility, illicit finance, and U.S. national security. She is also the U.S. research and policy manager for Transparency International’s Defense and Security Program and an adjunct professor at Georgetown University.  Prior to joining Transparency International, Vittori was a senior policy adviser for Global Witness, where she managed educational and advocacy activities on linkages between corruption and national security. Prior to that, Vittori served in the U.S. Air Force, advancing to the rank of lieutenant colonel; her overseas service included Afghanistan, Iraq, South Korea, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Saudi Arabia, and Bahrain, and she was assigned to NATO’s only counter-corruption task force. She was an assistant professor and military faculty at the U.S. Air Force Academy and the National Defense University. Vittori has published on conflict finance and illicit financial flows and she is the author of the book Terrorist Financing and Resourcing and a co-author of the handbook Corruption Threats and International Missions: Practical Guidance for Leaders.  She is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy and received her PhD in International Studies from the University of Denver.

  • Op-Ed Global Insights March 22, 2021
    Illicit Financial Flows in Authoritarian States

    The COVID-19 pandemic is proving a boon for corrupt, authoritarian leaders and their cronies, allowing them to expand opportunities for crime and graft while curtailing oversight and accountability.

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  • Op-Ed World Politics Review December 21, 2020
    Congress’ Ban on Shell Companies Is a Game-Changer Against Graft

    A measure in the annual National Defense Authorization Act will require the Treasury Department to begin collecting beneficial ownership information on companies registered in the United States, effectively banning anonymously owned companies, including shell companies that are often used as fronts for dirty money.

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  • Dubai’s Role in Facilitating Corruption and Global Illicit Financial Flows
    Report July 7, 2020
    Dubai’s Role in Facilitating Corruption and Global Illicit Financial Flows

    Dubai is just one of many enablers of global corruption, crime, and illicit financial flows, but addressing the emirate’s role presents anticorruption practitioners, law enforcement agencies, and policymakers with particularly complex challenges.

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  • Illicit Financial Flows Will be Easier During the Coronavirus Pandemic
    Op-Ed The Hill April 2, 2020
    Illicit Financial Flows Will be Easier During the Coronavirus Pandemic

    International criminal organizations are now exploiting the coronavirus crisis. The corrupt and criminal entities that thrive on illicit financial flows, or the transfer of illegally earned money across borders, can seize the moment.

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  • America Has Responsibility To Pick Winner and Losers in Afghanistan
    Op-Ed The Hill August 12, 2019
    America Has Responsibility To Pick Winners and Losers in Afghanistan

    The goal of the United States should be to create conditions that leave the possibility for Afghans to build a more legitimate government and security sector in future decades.

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  • Bahrain’s Fragility and Security Sector Procurement
    Paper February 26, 2019
    Bahrain’s Fragility and Security Sector Procurement

    Unchecked security spending and endemic corruption may destabilize the Bahraini regime and imperil U.S. interests, so the United States should push it to reform.

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Source: http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/index.cfm?fa=expert_view&expert_id=1671

Areas of Expertise

 
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
 
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