George Perkovich

Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Chair
Vice President for Studies
tel +1 202 939 2305 fax +1 202 483 4462
Perkovich works primarily on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation issues; cyberconflict; and new approaches to international public-private management of strategic technologies.
 

Education

PhD, University of Virginia
MA, Harvard University
BA, University of California at Santa Cruz 

Languages

English; French; Russian

 

George Perkovich is the Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Chair and vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, overseeing the Technology and International Affairs Program and Nuclear Policy Program. He works primarily on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation issues; cyberconflict; and new approaches to international public-private management of strategic technologies.

He is the author of the prize-winning book, India’s Nuclear Bomb (University of California Press, 1999), and co-author of, Not War, Not Peace? Motivating Pakistan to Prevent Cross-Border Terrorism (Oxford University Press, 2016). Perkovich’s short-form writing has appeared in leading international journals and newspapers. He has advised many agencies of the U.S. government, and testified before both houses of Congress. He has been a member of the National Academy of Science’s Committee on Arms Control and International Security, the Council on Foreign Relations Task Force on Nuclear Policy, and was a principal adviser to the International Commission on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Disarmament, a joint initiative of the governments of Japan and Australia. He served as a speechwriter and foreign policy adviser to Senator Joe Biden (D-Del.) from 1989-90. 

  • Op-Ed Foreign Affairs December 16, 2021
    Will More States Acquire Nuclear Weapons?

    A broad pool of experts offer their thoughts on the risk of expanding nuclear weapons capabilities.

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  • Lawfare August 2, 2021
    Responsible Cyber Offense

    Major powers bear responsibility for reducing systemic risk in cyberspace, and to do this they must make offensive operations more predictable.

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  • Op-Ed Lawfare August 2, 2021
    Responsible Cyber Offense

    News of the SolarWinds hack emerged with reports the incident had triggered an emergency Saturday meeting at the National Security Council. In the weeks that followed, the story dominated headlines.

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  • Op-Ed Government Executive April 22, 2021
    How Cyber Ops Increase the Risk of Accidental Nuclear War

    The risk of the United States and China going to war, leading to a nuclear exchange, is growing by the day. Cyber operations by either or both countries increase the risk significantly, as each side is tempted to use cyber tools to gain warning and an early edge in a crisis.

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  • China-U.S. Cyber-Nuclear C3 Stability
    Paper April 8, 2021
    China-U.S. Cyber-Nuclear C3 Stability

    Cyber threats to nuclear command, control, and communications systems (NC3) attract increasing concerns. Carnegie and partners have developed a platform of unclassified knowledge to enable U.S.-China engagement on this issue.

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  • Op-Ed Arms Control Today March 9, 2021
    Toward a Just U.S. Nuclear Declaratory Policy

    Ultimately, if the United States wishes to retain or restore its international leadership in a global nuclear order, its declaratory policy should be one that Americans and others would find relatively acceptable if other states adopted it.

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  • Op-Ed International Luxembourg Forum on Preventing Nuclear Catastrophe January 31, 2021
    The Near Future of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Regime

    The non-proliferation regime is a very important element of the broader nuclear order. That broader order involves restraint and deterrence in the potential use of nuclear weapons, commitments to preserve strategic stability, cooperation in preventing proliferation.

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  • Op-Ed Defense One January 26, 2021
    How Biden Can Reduce the Danger of Nuclear War

    By extending the New START Treaty with Russia, President Joe Biden will signal a measure of sanity. But more must be done to reassure Americans and the world that proportionality is at the heart of the United States’ nuclear policies and posture.

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  • Proportionate Deterrence: A Model Nuclear Posture Review
    Report January 21, 2021
    Proportionate Deterrence: A Model Nuclear Posture Review

    Since the 1990s, every U.S. presidential administration has published a Nuclear Posture Review that explains the rationales behind its nuclear strategy, doctrine, and requested forces. The review envisioned and summarized here explicitly elucidates the dilemmas, uncertainties, and tradeoffs that come with current and possible alternative nuclear policies and forces.

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  • Washington Quarterly December 11, 2020 中文
    How Much Is Too Much? Bounding Nuclear Deterrents

    For decades, policy debates in nuclear-armed states have centered on the question of ‘how much is enough,’ but on the cusp of a new arms race, the urgent question has shifted to: how much is too much?

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  • Georgetown University Press October 16, 2017
    Understanding Cyber Conflict: 14 Analogies

    Understanding Cyber Conflict draws lessons from past technological disruptions to inform and shape responses to today’s cyber challenges.

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  • Oxford University Press India August 25, 2016
    Not War, Not Peace: Motivating Pakistan to Prevent Cross-Border Terrorism

    A comprehensive assessment of the violent and non-violent options available to India to deter and respond to cross-border terrorism from Pakistan.

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  • March 24, 2015
    Turkey’s Nuclear Future

    Turkey is a rising economic and political force with the ability to affect dynamics in the greater Middle East, the Caucasus, and Central Asia. To meet its rising energy needs, the country—already an important actor in the international nuclear order—plans to establish nuclear power plants on its territory.

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  • April 1, 2013
    Do Unto Others: Toward a Defensible Nuclear Doctrine

    President Barack Obama should articulate a narrowed framework for the legitimate use of nuclear weapons that the United States believes would be defensible for others to follow as long as nuclear weapons remain.

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  • Abolishing Nuclear Weapons: A Debate
    Carnegie Endowment for International Peace February 13, 2009
    Abolishing Nuclear Weapons: A Debate

    A distinguished group of experts from thirteen countries explore how to overcome obstacles to nuclear disarmament and pose questions that require further official and nongovernmental deliberation.

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  • Adelphi Paper September 16, 2008
    Abolishing Nuclear Weapons

    In this new Adelphi Paper published by the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), George Perkovich and James M. Acton examine the challenges that exist to abolishing nuclear weapons completely, and suggest what can be done now to start overcoming them.

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  • Strategic Studies Institute October 1, 2005
    Iran Gets the Bomb—Then What?

    The acquisition of nuclear weapons by terrorists or any additional states would shake the international system. The more strategically important the state, the greater the potential threat to global security.

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  • Cover - India's Nuclear Bomb: The Impact on Global
    University of California Press, Oxford University Press in South Asia November 5, 2001
    India's Nuclear Bomb: The Impact on Global Proliferation

     

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  • Cover - India's Nuclear Bomb: The Impact on Global
    Berkeley, University of California Press December 2, 1999
    India's Nuclear Bomb: The Impact on Global Proliferation

    Why did India bid for nuclear weapon status at a time when 149 nations had signed a ban on nuclear testing? What drove India's new Hindu nationalist government to depart from decades of nuclear restraint, a control that no other nation with similar capacities had displayed? How has U.S. nonproliferation policy affected India's decision making?

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  • Navigating a Turbulent Future: What to Expect in 2022?
    December 9, 2021 Live on YouTube and Facebook عربي
    Navigating a Turbulent Future? What to Expect in 2022

    The Malcolm H. Kerr Carnegie Middle East Center will be holding its fifth annual conference on Wednesday, December 8, and Thursday, December 9, 2021, to delve deeper into what to expect in 2022.

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  • The Growing Threat of Nuclear Proliferation
    December 8, 2021 YouTube @CARNEGIEMENA عربي
    The Growing Threat of Nuclear Proliferation

    Join us on Wednesday, December 8 from 19:30-20:30 EET for a public panel discussion with Rose Gottemoeller, Mark Hibbs and George Perkovich chaired by Névine Schepers.

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  • Meeting Challenges in the Indo-Pacific and China: French Strategic Perspectives
    July 14, 2021 Live Online
    Meeting Challenges in the Indo-Pacific and China: French Strategic Perspectives

    Join us for a timely conversation with the French Minister for Europe and Foreign Affairs, Jean-Yves Le Drian.

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  • The Cyberweapons Arms Race
    February 23, 2021 Live Online
    This is How They Tell Me the World Ends: The Cyberweapons Arms Race

    Join us for a conversation featuring George Perkovich and Nicole Perlroth as the two discuss Perlroth’s recently published book, This is How They Tell Me the World Ends, and the urgent threat to us all if we cannot bring the cyber arms race to heel.

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  • Nuclear Policy and Posture in the Biden Administration
    February 5, 2021 Live Online
    Nuclear Policy and Posture in the Biden Administration

    In “Proportionate Deterrence: A Model Nuclear Posture Review,” George Perkovich and Pranay Vaddi provide analysis and recommendations for the Biden Administration. Please join the authors for a conversation about their recommendations with Michèle Flournoy.

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  • Nuclear Diplomacy: Biden's Middle East Aspirations
    February 4, 2021 Live on Facebook and YouTube
    Nuclear Diplomacy: Biden's Middle East Aspirations

    Nuclear nonproliferation in the Middle East is a major policy challenge for President Joe Biden, who is eager to return to the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran.

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  • The UN Nuclear Ban Treaty Enters Into Force in January: Then What?
    November 13, 2020 Live Online
    The UN Nuclear Ban Treaty Enters Into Force in January: Then What?

    Now that fifty countries have signed and ratified the UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, it will enter into force in January 2021, creating an important milestone in international efforts to ban nuclear weapons. What is the future of the nuclear ban after the Treaty passes this important milestone?

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  • February 5, 2020 Washington, DC
    A Conversation With IAEA Director General Rafael Grossi

    Ambassador Rafael Mariano Grossi assumed the office of director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on December 3, 2019. Join us for a moderated conversation.

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  • India’s Pandemic Preparedness and Response: Role of Scientists and Industry Experts
    December 6, 2019 Bengaluru
    India’s Pandemic Preparedness and Response

    Outbreaks of life-threatening infectious diseases such as Ebola in West Africa, Zika in South America, Avian influenza in China, and Nipah in India are occurring with increasing frequency.

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  • September 26, 2019 Washington, DC
    The Future of Nuclear Arms Control

    Mary Robinson, former president of Ireland, and Gro Harlem Brundtland, former prime minister of Norway, will discuss the future of nuclear arms control.

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Source: http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/index.cfm?fa=expert_view&expert_id=145
 
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